skin

(redirected from Corneocyte)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Encyclopedia.
Related to Corneocyte: stratum corneum
See: denude
References in periodicals archive ?
However, compared with soft water, skin exposed to hard water has increased dilution of the natural moisturizing factors and alteration of the corneocyte layers, resulting in increased disruption of the protective epidermal barrier.
Sebum may serve as nutrition to facilitate biota growth and metabolism, thereby enhancing proliferation of keratinocytes and their transformation to comeocytes as well as serve as a glue cementing corneocytes to form flakes.
The stratum corneum has been described as a 'brick wall' (Cork and Danby 2009 p872-877) where the 'bricks' are corneocytes.
Schmuth M, Gruber R, Ellias PM, Williams ML: Ichthyoses update: towards a function driven model of pathogenesis of the disorder of cornification and the role of corneocyte proteins in these disorders.
Proteins known as keratin, a fatty, waterproof envelope, and flat corneocyte cells make up the stratum corneum.
The cause of cerumen accumulation is probably a failure of corneocyte separation.
2011) Influence of aqueous cream on corneocyte size, maturity, skin protease activity, protein content and transepidermal water loss.
Although some compounds such as ethanol and oleic acid were shown to penetrate corneocyte structure, a literature search reveals no clear evidence for penetration of solid particles into the corneocyte body.
The main epithelial cell, the keratinocyte, as it ascends the layers of the epidermis undergoes a complex, pre-programmed process before sloughing off as a mature corneocyte.
The reason for this is not clear, but one theory is that the increase in corneocyte surface area seen in elderly skin may cause increased stratum corneum water transit times.
It was first proposed 3 decades ago and now is widely appreciated that the structure of the stratum corneum is analogous to that of a brick wall, with corneocyte "bricks" held in place by the extracellular matrix "mortar.
It was first proposed 3 decades ago and now is widely appreciated that the structure of the stratum corneum is analogous to that of a brick wall, with corneocyte "bricks" held in place by the extracellular matrix "mortar" (1-3) The stratum corneum barrier relies predominantly on the extracellular matrix, where lamellar bilayers block the outflow of water into the environment and prevent the ingress of toxic substances, allergens, and microbial pathogens into the body.