Corollary


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Corollary

A consequence or result that can be logically drawn from the existence of a set of facts by the exercise of common sense and reason.

References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, if we let L = [B.sub.k] be the general Boolean algebra in Corollary 48, then we will obtain the following corollary.
For [alpha] = 1, a = 1/4, b = 3/4 and f same as in above corollary, we obtain:
Corollary 6 I (X, T) is anti locally countable and A is [zeta]-closed, [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
Since the spherical curve n(v) is a circle, from Corollary 3.12, Bertrand curve [[integral].sup.v.sub.0][[??].sub.n](v)dv is a circular helix (see Figure 3).
In the present case, A is sequentially Mackey complete and [[rho].sub.A](a) [less than or equal to] [[beta].sub.A](a) for each a [member of] A (see [6], Corollary 4.3).
Using the previous theorem and (16) we immediately obtain the following corollary.
We obtain from formulas (4.10)-(4.11) of Corollary 4.4 the following identities,
Corollary 2: The sensitivity and specificity of a test depend upon a "gold standard" of diagnosis, which is dependent upon equipment (imaging, for example), operator skill or the stage of disease.
Corollary: -b = -c implies b = c, by setting a = 0.
Data suggest that in schizophrenia, corollary discharge fails to alert the temporal lobes that these thoughts are self-generated, leading to the misattribution of inner speech to external sources and producing the experience of auditory hallucinations, said Dr.
Practical security rests on three key principles and a simple corollary. The key principles are authentication, authorization and auditing.
As a corollary to this discussion, Di Maria convincingly reconstructs the stage setting of Aretino's Orazia from verbal indications given by the characters.