Corporate


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Corporate

Pertaining to or possessing the qualities of a corporation, a legal entity created—pursuant to state law—to serve the purposes set out in its certificate of incorporation.

A corporate officer is an individual who is charged with the management of a corporation by virtue of a position as its president, vice president, treasurer, or secretary.

References in periodicals archive ?
Corporate America Undergoes Big Changes Under Pritts Regime: Managers shuffled, staff reduced, balance sheet revamped and new fee structure coming for Alabama-based corporate.
Options cases, however, more often appear to involve shareholder "derivative" lawsuits, where the investor sues to force a change in corporate practices.
With a unified full-cycle solution, corporate treasurers can rest easy knowing that external and internal models and methods (fixed income, credit, equity, foreign exchange) are validated in-house to ensure a clean and accurate corporate portfolio.
The IRS argued that the cross-reference is intended to refer only to the definition of "taxable period" and that, since the large corporate underpayment had set up a different threshold ($100,000 vs.
The contribution communicators can make is to get involved in organizationwide, national and international dialogue about how to improve corporate governance while promoting global prosperity and cooperation.
When all phases of construction are completed in 2009, Seagate Corporate Center will consist of office suites for lease as well as industrial condominiums and freestanding buildings.
A 26-year veteran of PwC, Brown brings a corporate manager's perspective to running INSEAD.
Mark Latham, a Wall Street veteran who founded the Corporate Monitoring Project to improve shareholder oversight of corporate management, warns that another pitfall of proxy voting is to cast one's ballots "along party lines," that is, according to recommendations laid out by a company's management team.
Section 802 applies not just to corporate fraud but to "the investigation or administration of any matter within the jurisdiction of any department or agency of the United States" It punishes a person who "knowingly alters, destroys, mutilates, conceals, covers up, falsifies, or makes a false entry in any record, document or tangible object" with new penalties of up to 20 years in prison.
The implications for company tax departments of enhanced law enforcement attention on corporate wrongdoing has been previously discussed in The Tax Executive.
Mexico's pension system has become an increasingly important source for corporate finance.
However, a prudent approach would be to issue debt with terms structured to avoid the AHYDO rules or to ensure that the issuing partnership has no corporate partners--either directly or by looking through to higher-tier owners.