juristic person

(redirected from Corporate personhood)

juristic person

a body recognized by the law as being entitled to rights and duties in the same way as a natural or human person, the common example being a company.
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Hobby Lobby (2)--both relied on a legal concept that was little-discussed in the majority opinions: corporate personhood.
trend, often referred to as corporate personhood, (24) has left an
To help voters assess how candidates measure up to the agenda, a questionnaire sent to all the candidates asked for their stances on six core issues: establishing contribution limits; amplifying the voices of small donors through public financing; increasing transparency and requiring "paid for by" disclaimers on campaign ads; expanding the right to vote and opposing barriers to voting; preventing gerrymandering by taking responsibility for redistricting out of the hands of politicians; and calling for a federal constitutional amendment to overturn Citizens United and corporate personhood.
Setting aside legalistic concepts of corporate personhood, however, there is some truth in seeing the in-house lawyer as the company's treating physician.
She enumerates and rebuts common arguments minimizing the relevance of corporate personhood in constitutional analysis, and argues that avoiding this issue obscures important value judgments.
This paper queries the concept of corporate personhood by investigating how metaphors of the body were deployed in court testimony during Enron's corporate fraud trial in 2006.
Four people are registered with the Pirate Party, an American political party founded in 2006 that supports reform of copyright laws to reflect "open source and free culture values, government transparency, protection of privacy and civil liberties, while rolling back corporate personhood and corporate welfare.
A will then analyze how prior case law and corporate personhood theories should have barred the application of the RFRA to for-profit, secular corporations.
The constitutional amendment could easily be interpreted as assuming the corporate personhood of "farmers and ranchers.
The organization behind these referendums is Move to Amend, a left-wing grassroots organization seeking an amendment to the Constitution to end corporate personhood and declare that money does not equal speech.
In a recent analysis of Marvel Studios' The Avengers (2012), critic Brian Droitcour convincingly illustrates how the Hobby Lobby era of corporate personhood extends into the art world: Superhero studios with monosyllabic monikers such as "Koons" and "Hirst" dominate the landscape.
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