Corpus Juris Civilis

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Related to Corpus Iuris Civilis: Codex Justinianus

Corpus Juris Civilis

[Latin, The body of the civil law.] The name given in the early seventeenth century to the collection of Civil Law based upon the compilation and Codification of the Roman system of Jurisprudence directed by the Emperor Justinian I during the years from 528 to 534 a.d.

Corpus Juris Civilis

Justinian's compilation of the Roman law for his empire. It is in four parts: the Institutes (a student introduction); the Digest or Pandects (a collation in four sections of the Roman law from the jurists, which was, however, heavily interpolated by the compilers); the Codex or Code (a compilation of legislative measures); and the Novels (some later supplementary laws). Both the Digest and the Institutes were to form the basis of the later revival of Roman law throughout the continental European world. They are still the object of intense study and debate today.

CORPUS JURIS CIVILIS. The body of the civil law. This, is the name given to a collection of the civil law, consisting of Justinian's Institutes, the Pandects or Digest, the Code, and the Novels.

References in periodicals archive ?
Para Mora y Jaraba el Corpus Iuris Civilis representaba un cumulo considerable de axiomas y postulados de caracter doctrinal, pero no mas que eso.
A busca pelo antigo com a consciencia da necessidade de inovacao faz-se presente no que concerne tambem ao direito e a dinamica de suas fontes, com a "redescoberta" e evidencia da tradicao romanistica, em pleno seculo XII, principalmente por meio da compilacao de textos de Justiniano, posteriormente chamada de Corpus iuris civilis (30).
Por el metodo de sus escritos principales, la glosa a los textos del Corpus iuris civilis, la nueva escuela fue llamada precisamente de los "glosadores".
Tras siglos de un olvido casi completo en occidente, a lo largo de la Baja Edad Media la compilacion justiniana se fue recuperando en las universidades del norte de italia, conformando lo que se conocera con el nombre de Corpus Iuris Civilis.
He can only be referring to civilian works founded on the Corpus iuris civilis, and of these, works founded on Justinian's Institutes are the only plausible models.
(93) Asi, pues, de cada una de las tres partes senaladas por el rector mediante un papel en el Corpus Iuris Civilis, las elegidas por D.
Issued between 529 and 534 by the Byzantine emperor Justinian I, the Corpus Iuris Civilis (Body of Civil Law or Codex Justinianus) was an extremely influential work in European jurisprudence from the 11th through the 19th centuries.
For example, the Statutes of Batavia cite the Corpus Iuris Civilis often: Digest 15.1 is cited for its discussion of peculium; Digest 21.1 and Codex 4.58 are mentioned in relation to the Roman Law principle of latent defect in relation to the sale of slaves; Codex 9.14.1 crops up in a discussion of the deaths of slaves resulting from excessive punishment by their owners.
En el tercero de los relatos de Gomez Valderrama, escrito en 1974, el cual lleva por titulo: "Corpus Iuris Civilis", Correa se detiene a analizar la figura de Andres Bello, reconocido publicamente como el "mayor poligrafo de toda America" (166).
After celebration of a special mass, the examiners showed the candidate three separate passages from the main texts of his discipline (for the law faculty, either the Corpus iuris civilis or the Corpus iuris canonici), and he prepared a formal address on the one of his choice.
The Digest, published in AD 533 as part of Justinian's codification (the Corpus Iuris Civilis),(2) contains an excerpt from Ulpian (D 9.2.27.14)(3) which in Dr Colin Kolbert's translation in Watson's edition begins:
The source books, for teachers and students alike, were the Corpus iuris civilis and the Corpus iuris canonici: the two together (with appropriate commentaries) represented the legal learning and wisdom of the age.