court of equity

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Related to Courts of equity: courts of law

court of equity

n. originally in English common law and in several states there were separate courts (often called chancery courts) which handled lawsuits and petitions requesting remedies other than damages, such as writs, injunctions, and specific performance. Gradually the courts of equity have merged with courts of law. Federal bankruptcy courts are the one example of courts which operate as courts of equity. (See: equity, chancery, court of law)

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Courts of equity, not law, had jurisdiction to grant preliminary injunctions to protect rights "from irreparable or at least from serious damage pending the trial of the legal right." (14) That is, the decision to grant or deny a preliminary injunction was a purely equitable one.
These authorities make out the proposition that courts of equity
This discussion of efficiency, and arguably flexibility, perhaps relates to the overarching debate concerning whether bankruptcy courts are courts of equity.
Howsoever beneficial this argument may seem, one must keep in mind that the conventional remedies devised by Courts of Equity, viz.
The jurisdiction of English courts of equity had gradually expanded
Courts of equity took care to justify their intervention in a legal action, basing their authority on the inadequacy of the remedy at law.
This Note will focus on the preliminary injunction standards used in Delaware and Massachusetts to illustrate the differences between the pure courts of equity in Delaware and the hybrids courts of law and equity in Massachusetts.
In the United States, this same division of power between courts of law and courts of equity existed until 1938, when enactment of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure formally merged law and equity jurisdiction in the federal courts.
Courts of admiralty are not, strictly speaking, courts of equity;
This ethical quality remains, and its presence explains to a large extent the adoption by courts of equity of broad general principles that may be applied with flexibility to new situations as they arise.
In America, with some exceptions in the states, courts either sit as courts of law or courts of equity, as the case requires, or as courts of combined jurisdiction with equity available as necessary to the court.