References in classic literature ?
This ideal of glory and grandeur- which consists not merely in considering nothing wrong that one does but in priding oneself on every crime one commits, ascribing to it an incomprehensible supernatural significance- that ideal, destined to guide this man and his associates, had scope for its development in Africa.
"The fool's crime is the crime that is found out, and the wise man's crime is the crime that is NOT found out.
It should not surprise us to find in the one man the perfection of two such lines of activity if we remember that the daily press was already beginning to transform itself and to become what it is to-day--the gazette of crime.
As to whether I have committed this crime, the truth is in one sentence: I could not have committed this crime.
"Rather say that you have served as an instrument to that accursed woman; but I swear to you that this crime shall be her last."
Will this crime persuade you of the justice of her punishment -- for of all this I have the proofs?"
From which it follows that, if society is normally organised, all crime will cease at once, since there will be nothing to protest against and all men will become righteous in one instant.
Lastly, as to the person, or persons, by whom the crime was committed.
The crime of murder being the most dreadful crime of all, tremendous excitement prevailed in the Emerald City when the news of Eureka's arrest and trial became known.
"Oh, this is very interesting," said Debray; "if there really has been a crime, we will investigate it."
In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the State and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.
"There are other consequences, not indeed so dreadful or replete with horror as this; and yet such, as, if attentively considered, must, one would think, deter all of your sex at least from the commission of this crime.

Full browser ?