criminal

(redirected from Criminals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

Criminal

Pertaining to, or involving, crimes or the administration of penal justice. An individual who has been found guilty of the commission of conduct that causes social harm and that is punishable by law; a person who has committed a crime.

criminal

1) n. a popular term for anyone who has committed a crime, whether convicted of the offense or not. More properly it should apply only to those actually convicted of a crime. Repeat offenders are sometimes called habitual criminals. 2) adj. certain acts or people involved in or relating to a crime. Examples of uses include "criminal taking," "criminal conspiracy," a "criminal gang." (See: convict, felon, habitual criminal)

criminal

noun bandit, blackguard, buccaneer, convict, defrauder, evildoer, extortionist, felon, filcher, fugitive, gangster, grafter, guilty person, gunman, hardened offender, juvenile delinquent, kidnapper, killer, knave, malefactor, malfeasant, manslayer, marauder, murderer, offender, outlaw, pilferer, pillager, pirate, plunderer, public enemy, recidivist, recreant, reus, robber, sceleratus, smuggler, sneak thief, swindler, terrorist, thief, transgressor, underworld character, villain, worker of iniquity, wrongdoer
Associated concepts: convicted criminal, criminal action, criminal attempt, criminal capacity, criminal case or cause, criminal charge, criminal code, criminal conduct, criminal conspiracy, criminal contempt, criminal conviction, criminal courts, criminal information, criminal intent, criminal judggents, criminal jurisdiction, criminal motive, criminal negliience, criminal offense, criminal procedure, criminal process, criminal prosecution, criminal responsibility, crimmnal sanctions, criminal solicitation, criminal statute, criminal syndicalism, criminal transaction, criminal trial, habitual criminal, known criminals
Foreign phrases: Frustra legis auxilium invocat qui in legem committit.He vainly seeks the aid of the law who transgresses the law.
See also: aggressor, assailant, blameful, blameworthy, burglar, convict, culpable, delinquent, embezzler, felon, felonious, guilty, hoodlum, illegal, illegitimate, illicit, immoral, impermissible, improper, iniquitous, irregular, larcenous, lawbreaker, lawless, malefactor, nefarious, offender, outlaw, peccant, prisoner, racketeer, recidivist, reprehensible, reprobate, tainted, thief, unconscionable, unlawful, vandal, vicious, wrongdoer, wrongful

criminal

1 a person convicted of CRIME.
2 of, involving, or guilty of CRIME.

CRIMINAL. Relating to, or having the character of crime; as, criminal law, criminal conversation, &c. It also signifies a person convicted of a crime.

LAW, CRIMINAL. By criminal law is understood that system of laws which provides for the mode of trial of persons charged with criminal offences, defines crimes, and provides for their punishments.

References in classic literature ?
Any attempt at recovering the bodies was absolutely hopeless, and there, deep down in that dreadful caldron of swirling water and seething foam, will lie for all time the most dangerous criminal and the foremost champion of the law of their generation.
The position is too absurd to merit a refutation, and yet this is precisely the position which those must establish who contend that the trial by juries in civil cases is abolished, because it is expressly provided for in cases of a criminal nature.
Arbitrary impeachments, arbitrary methods of prosecuting pretended offenses, and arbitrary punishments upon arbitrary convictions, have ever appeared to me to be the great engines of judicial despotism; and these have all relation to criminal proceedings.
And as to the conduct of the officers of the revenue, the provision in favor of trial by jury in criminal cases, will afford the security aimed at.
They have tended to show that the security of liberty is materially concerned only in the trial by jury in criminal cases, which is provided for in the most ample manner in the plan of the convention; that even in far the greatest proportion of civil cases, and those in which the great body of the community is interested, that mode of trial will remain in its full force, as established in the State constitutions, untouched and unaffected by the plan of the convention; that it is in no case abolished[3] by that plan; and that there are great if not insurmountable difficulties in the way of making any precise and proper provision for it in a Constitution for the United States.
It certainly sounds not a little harsh and extraordinary to affirm that there is no security for liberty in a Constitution which expressly establishes the trial by jury in criminal cases, because it does not do it in civil also; while it is a notorious fact that Connecticut, which has been always regarded as the most popular State in the Union, can boast of no constitutional provision for either.
And now, Fellow Citizens and Creatures of the Jury, I assert that so awful a crime deserves death, and in the case of the ferocious criminal before you--who is now washing her face--the death penalty should be inflicted nine times.
It is seldom that any man, unless he is very full-blooded, breaks out in this way through emotion, so I hazarded the opinion that the criminal was probably a robust and ruddy-faced man.
KARACHI -- As many as 184 criminals and 73 terrorists were killed during at least 480 police encounters in 2017 in Karachi.
The activities normally associated with criminals have expanded beyond national borders and--adding to the usual drugs, weapons, contraband, and sex trade--have become modalities to serve the criminal finances generated.
Fish-blooded" criminals targeted residents with money or goods--successful, hard-working Chicagoans, like the jurors themselves.
Bill Borklund, the father, and Joshua Borklund, the son, have made it a point to interfere in the plans of criminals, even going so far as to chase down petty thieves and armed robbers.