Dead letters


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DEAD LETTERS. Those which remain in the post-office, uncalled for. By the Act of March 8, 1825, 3 Story. L. U. S. 1993, it is enacted, by Sec. 26, "That the postmasters shall, respectively, publish, at the expiration of every three months, or oftener, when the postmaster general shall so direct, in one of the newspapers published at, or nearest, the place of his residence, for three successive weeks, a list of all the letters remaining in their respective offices; or instead thereof, shall make out a number of such lists, and cause them to be posted at such public places, in their vicinity, as shall appear to them best adapted for the information of the parties concerned; and, at the expiration of the next three months, shall send such of the said letters as then remain on hand, as dead letters, to the general post office where the same shall be opened and inspected; and if any valuable papers, or matters of consequence, shall be found therein, it shall be the duty of the postmaster general to return such letter to the writer thereof, or cause a descriptive list thereof to be inserted in one of the newspapers published at the place most convenient to the supposed residence of the owner, if within the United States; and such letter, and the contents, shall be preserved, to be delivered to the person to whom the same shall be addressed, upon payment of the postage, and the expense of publication. And if such letter contain money, the postmaster general may appropriate it to the use of the department, keeping an account thereof, and the amount shall be paid by the department to the claimant as soon as he shall be found."
     3. And by the Act of July 2, 1836, 4 Sharsaw. Cont. of Story, L. U. S. 2474, it is enacted by Sec. 35 that advertisements of letters remaining in the post-offices, may, under the direction of the postmaster general, be made in more than one newspaper: provided, that the whole cost of advertising shall not exceed four cents for each letter.

References in periodicals archive ?
Mulroy and pianist John Reid delivered Dead Letters with authority and dedicated commitment, as they did with other well-established masterpieces: Britten's First Canticle, and Winter Words (such a wonderful feel for Hardy's often desolate poetry and Britten's brittle, apposite piano-writing), Tippett's awesomely difficult The Heart's Assurance, with its many resonances of the equally demanding - but so rewarding - opera The Midsummer Marriage, and songs by Purcell and John Ireland.
AVID fans of Midsomer Murders, of which they are many, will recognise two old faces in this week's new film, Dead Letters (ITV1, Sunday).
Anyway, tonight's episode, Dead Letters, is set during the village's annual knees-up, Oak Apple Week.
If the State Legislature does not act on the Governor's budget by the next fiscal year, the bills in the Governor's budget become dead letters.