deception

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deception

n. the act of misleading another through intentionally false statements or fraudulent actions. (See: fraud, deceit)

deception

noun artifice, beguilement, blind, bluff, camouflage, charlatanry, cheat, chicane, chicanery, con, counterfeit, cozenage, craft, craftiness, cunning, deceit, decoy, defraudation, defraudment, delusion, device, disguise, dishonesty, dissimulation, dodge, double-dealing, dupery, duplicity, equivocation, fabrication, fake, false appearance, false front, falsehood, falseness, falsification, feint, forgery, fraud, fraudulence, fraudulency, guile, hoax, illusion, imposition, imposture, indirection, insincerity, intrigue, knavery, legerdemain, lie, machination, masquerade, mendacity, mirage, obliquity, pretext, prevarication, rascality, roguery, ruse, sham, simulacrum, snare, stratagem, subterfuge, trap, trepan, trick, trickery, trickiness, trumpery, untruth, untruthfulness, unveracity, wile
Associated concepts: confusion, deception doctrine
Foreign phrases: Non decipitur qui scit se decipi.He is not deceived who knows that he is being deceived. Decipi quam fallere est tutius. It is safer to be deceived than to deceive.
See also: artifice, bad faith, canard, collusion, color, contrivance, corruption, counterfeit, deceit, decoy, disguise, dishonesty, distortion, duplicity, evasion, fallacy, falsehood, falsification, figment, forgery, fraud, hoax, hypocrisy, imposture, indirection, knavery, lie, maneuver, misrepresentation, misstatement, pettifoggery, plot, pretense, pretext, ruse, sham, sophistry, story, stratagem, subreption, subterfuge, trick

deception

in English criminal law it is an offence to obtain property by deception. It is committed by deceiving, whether deliberately or recklessly, by words or conduct as to fact or law, including the person's present intentions. It is also an offence to obtain services in this way.
References in periodicals archive ?
Let us begin with the distinctions between different kinds of sexual deceptions Dougherty claims are problematic for the lenient view.
With news of Megatron's return to the big screen via the upcoming 'Transformers: The Last Knight,' Universal studios unveiled the new and improved look of the Deception leader.
A new frontier in defense in depth is implementation of dynamic deception solutions that takes a favorite hacker strategy--deception--and uses it again them.
8) When employed in cyberspace, FFOs could disguise deceptions in a similar manner.
The mix of contributors reflects the editorial view that deception is a "complex, multifaceted, and elusive phenomenon," and that it would be a form of "reductionism" for the collection as a whole to offer a definition of deception (or of lying), or to determine that deception is to be morally condemned, or even that, on a "cost-benefit analysis," deception is advantageous (15).
The concept of strategic deception is not new in strategy and can be traced to early writings of Sun Tzu, Machiavelli, and Aristotle, among others.
Deception has been a useful tool in the study of human behavior, and for that reason has been employed frequently in psychological research.
The "Sino-Soviet Split," the alleged splits between the USSR and Romania, Yugoslavia, and Czechoslovakia, and Moscow's "break" with so-called "Eurocommunist" moderates in Western Europe were all elaborate deceptions managed by the Kremlin and its KGB strategists.
The author concludes his book with famous escapes and appendixes of tricksters from scriptures, literature, and Greek mythology and examples of American doublespeak, which shows that deception has been going on forever.
The man wanted for the alleged deceptions is from Manchester.
Even before the secret tapes surfaced, there were any number of ways Nixon could have been proven a liar, and when the so-called "smoking-gun" tape of the June 23, 1972, conversation with Bob Haldeman surfaced, two of his deceptions were demolished: His claim that he had not been involved in covering up anything, and his argument that he had no involvement whatsoever in implicating the CIA in the Watergate matter.
The psychologists are also testing how well professional sleuths, such as police and judges, can detect deceptions.