Geneva Convention

(redirected from Declaration of Geneva)
Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.
Related to Declaration of Geneva: Hippocratic oath

Geneva Convention

an international convention adopted in Geneva. There have been a number of these. The one most likely to be encountered by the general public is that on treatment of prisoners of war. As a convention it is part of international law. Other notable conventions carrying the Geneva name are those on Law of the Sea 1958 and the 1951 Law Relating to the Status of Refugees.
References in periodicals archive ?
Physician's Oath or the Declaration of Geneva was adopted at Geneva in 1948 by the General Assembly, of the World Medical Association.
Declaration of Geneva. [Online] [Cited 2016 Sep 02].
India has also updated the Declaration of Geneva in the form of 'Code of Medical Ethics'.
It is common that medical schools base their own oaths in the Declaration of Geneva. Examples would be the Hippocratic Oath, Faculty of Medicine, University of Zaragoza and the Oath of the School of Medicine of the University of San Diego, California, expressing:
Declaration of Geneva. http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/g1/ (accessed 17 July 2014).
The Declaration of Geneva states, "I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception" and the International Code of Medical Ethics says that "a doctor must always bear in mind the obligation of preserving human life from the time of conception until death."
He quoted various Medical Declarations, such as The Declaration of Geneva (1948), which states, "I will maintain the utmost respect for human life from the time of conception, even under threat," and the International Medical Declaration (similar to Lejeune Declaration, 1973), which states, "As medicine remains at the service of life at its end, so it protects life from its beginning".
Immediately following, in 1948, the Declaration of Geneva was developed by the World Medical Association (WMA).
(8) The first international document recognizing the special status of children was the Geneva Declaration of the Rights of the Child (hereinafter, Declaration of Geneva), (9) adopted by the Fifth Assembly of the League of Nations in 1924.
The Declaration of Geneva - an oath that some doctors take - includes these words: "I solemnly pledge myself to consecrate my life to the service of humanity...
Others include the Oath of Maimonides, the Declaration of Geneva, and originals created by local faculty or student groups.
Rival factions signed the Declaration of Geneva committing them to ending the civil war which has killed more than a million people in its 36-year history.

Full browser ?