definition

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definition

noun clarification, decipherment, decoding, delimitation, delineation, demarcation, description, equivalent meaning, exact meaning, exact statement, explanation, explication, expressed meaning, formulation, identification, illumination, interpretation, making intelligible, meaning, representation, simplification, statement of meannng, synonym, translation
Foreign phrases: Omnis definitio in jure civili periculosa est, parum est enim ut non subverti possit.Every definiiion in the law is dangerous, because there is little that cannot be subverted.
See also: clarification, construction, description, explanation, identification, meaning, rendition, specification

DEFINITION. An enumeration of the principal ideas of which a compound idea is formed, to ascertain and explain its nature and character; or it is that which denotes and points out the substance of a thing, to us. Ayliffe's Pand. 59.
     2. A definition ought to contain every idea which belongs to the thing defined, and exclude all others.
     3. A definition should be, 1st. Universal, that is, such that it will apply equally to all individuals of, the same kind. 2d. Proper, that is, such that it will not apply to any other individual of any other kind. 3d. Clear, that is, without any equivocal, vague, or unknown word. 4th. Short, that is, without any useless word, or any foreign to the idea intended to be defined.
     4. Definitions are always dangerous, because it is always difficult to prevent their being inaccurate, or their becoming so; omnis definitio injure civili periculosa est, parum est enim, ut non subvertipossit.
     5. All ideas are not susceptible of definitions, and many words cannot be defined. This inability is frequently supplied, in a considerable degree, by descriptions. (q.v.)

References in periodicals archive ?
Lexical definitions are the most common kind of definition that writers and copyeditors encounter.
Alone, this problem of definitions can only stimulate conversations about what counts as innuendo or metaphor and what falls short.
Business groups are going to work on revising the current draft definitions to address their concerns as to a state taxing other digital goods under its tangible personal property definition.
Reacting to the uncertain changes in health care and its effects on their abilities to practice medicine, some physicians discovered they could take advantage of the liberal definitions of disability, which proved costly to carriers.
Many would object to these definitions, as Taylor admits, but he was faced with the problem of finding working definitions for the encyclopedia.
In using this approach, I follow Leamnson's suggestion to teach concepts first and then let the more technical definitions follow [2].
Sensible communication and reasoned debate depend upon accepted definitions of words.
There is little disagreement among those who study or deal with gangs that the availability and widespread use of a uniform definition would be extremely useful for a variety of important purposes, but few are willing to relinquish and replace the definitions that have become established within their agencies and are intimately related to agency operations.
The legislative history confirms that Congress intended to adopt the SEC's definitions of certain enumerated non-audit services, including the SEC's exceptions for appraisal, valuation, and actuarial tax services.
Home-care surveillance poses several unique challenges, including lack of nationally accepted standard definitions and surveillance methods, loss of patient follow-up, lack of trained infection control personnel in home-care settings, difficulty in capturing clinical and laboratory data, and difficulty in obtaining numerator and denominator data.
As you can see, these behavioral definitions contain the "process" of sending words to each other that underpins the efficiency of people working together.
Moreover, numerous authors and forecasters (Borsay, 1986; Jongbloed and Crichton, 1990; Harper, 1993) have noted a dissatisfaction with existing static-disease models for viewing disability in adults and children and chronicled the movement from an individualistic conception of disability to a socio-political definition.