demonstrative

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Related to Demonstrative adjective: demonstrative pronoun, possessive adjective

demonstrative

(Expressive of emotion), adjective communicative, effusive, emotional, emotive, excitable, expressive, fanatical, fervent, feverish, fierce, fiery, free in expression, furious, histrionic, maudlin, overflowing, passionate, prone to display of feeling, prone to emotional display, talkative, temperamental, unrestrained, vehement, violent, without reserve

demonstrative

(Illustrative), adjective affording proof, allegorical, analytical, annotative, characteristic, confirmative, confirmatory, confirming, connotative, corroborating, declarative, delineatory, depictive, elucidative, enlightening, exegetic, exegetical, explicative, explicatory, explicit, expository, expressive, graphic, illuminating, illuminative, informative, informing, interpretive, representative, revealing, substantiative, suggesting, suggestive, supportive, telling, typical, verificative, verifying
Associated concepts: demonstrative bequest, demonstrative evidence, demonstrative gift, demonstrative legacy, demonstrative words
See also: apparent, clear, declaratory, probative, suggestive, vehement

LEGACY, DEMONSTRATIVE. A demonstrative legacy is a bequest of a certain sum of money; intended for the legatee at all events, with a fund particularly referred to for its payment; so that if the estate be not the testator's property at his death, the legacy will not fail: but be payable out of general assets. 1 Rop. Leg. 153; Lownd. Leg 85; Swinb. 485; Ward on Leg. 370.

References in periodicals archive ?
This is undoubtedly associated with the fact that both deixis and pseudo-deixis make use of mutually-exclusive pairs, namely demonstrative adjectives and pronouns, personal pronouns, and the adverbs now, then, here, and there.
Working with nouns, pronouns, articles, possessive and demonstrative adjectives, past participles, and adjectives--with most of her study devoted to the latter, dependent upon their endings--Labrosse ultimately suggests three ways to "desex" grammatical gender in French.