denotation

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Crucially, none of the narrative connections here require the reader to know the denotative meaning of the word.
A word might have one or two denotative meanings, but could have 40 or more connotative meanings.
We have also identified some regularities in the renderings of compounds that express denotative meanings. The renderings of compounds that convey metaphorical meanings or cultural values seem to be less predictable: in the former case because meaning is subject to the translator's interpretation, in the latter case because cultural filtering usually determines a reformulation.
If the Maori language is utilised to clarify (and de-animate) things in the world so that they conform to a denotative meaning (logocentrism), then it could be a case of a square peg being forced into a round hole.
Generalization (alternatively termed broadening or extension) widens the denotative meaning of a word, rendering it broader or more inclusive over time.
The differences are so marked that, despite the obvious similarities in denotative meaning, the two verbs will be argued to belong to different subclasses within the general class of verbs of communication.
Thinking of it as an opportunity to defend what you have done, written, found, and what your conclusions signify is exactly the denotative meaning of the term.
In oil paintings, colors and tone can be used to evoke symbolic as well as denotative meaning. With oil paintings, the issues of color, tone, perspective, and symbolism enable the artist to attend to multiple topics, political stances, and emotions, without necessarily organizing them logically or sequentially, as is the case within textual representations.
For example, consider a high-taking complement predicate like remember, where the different syntactic constructions do not necessarily entail a change in the denotative meaning:
The first use is similar to "I understand," while the second use is the denotative meaning of "see."
Gillock skillfully articulates the feelings expressed in Messiaen's music and charts ways for performers to evoke them--but he does not normally address the music's denotative meaning.
[H]uman beings hear the voice first, and then, instantly, measure the sound of the voice against the denotative meaning of the words, altering the final meaning.