decay

(redirected from Dental decay)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Dental decay: Tooth Cavity, Dental cavities
References in periodicals archive ?
Keywords: Dental decay, Dental fluorosis, Fluoride toothpastes, Karachi.
The existing school tooth brushing program in Logan was recently evaluated and results showed a 19 per cent reduction in dental decay at the schools that were part of the program compared to those that werent.
Presence of dental decay was observed in n = 287 (61%) children whereas n =183 (39%) students were found to have sound teeth with no dental decay.
Dental decay rates were also studied in relationship to five neighbourhood-level SES classifications: low, moderately low, moderate, moderately high, and high.
Nurses may identify mothers with high rates of dental decay, refer them to a dental provider, and reduce the risk of transmission of decay-causing bacteria to the infant following birth.
In addition we have commissioned a universal programme for fluoride toothpaste and brushes for nursery aged children up to school entry age, and further targeted work for preventing dental decay in those schools with the poorest dental health.
After testing the assumptions, a bivariate analysis was performed between both population groups as well as the available covariates including patient characteristics such as age, gender, education, major sociocultural factors such as poor access to care, oral health awareness, poor financial status, adverse oral health perceptions, adverse perceptions of periodontal disease, and dental characteristics such as periodontal disease and dental decay.
To address such disparities as 85 per cent of three to five years olds have or have had a cavity and the rates of dental decay among Inuit are two to three times higher than the average Canadian, ITK has collaborated with Inuit regions to create the action plan.
ISLAMABAD -- Soft drinks could be hard on your teeth, and cause dental decay, say researchers who looked at the consumption of sugary beverages and fluoridated water.
Dentists offer a number of reasons so many preschoolers suffer from such extensive dental decay.
LEVELS of dental decay amongst children in Wales are unacceptably high, according to the National Assembly for Wales's Children and Young People Committee, who are recommending that the Welsh Government provides more support for parents to ensure they understand the important role they have to play in keeping their children's teeth healthy.