Desperate


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DESPERATE. Of which there is no hope.
     2. This term is used frequently, in making an inventory of a decedent's effects, when a debt is considered so bad that there is no hope of recovering it. It is then called a desperate debt, and, if it be so returned, it will be prima facie, considered as desperate. See Toll. Ex. 248 2 Williams, Ex. 644; 1 Chit. Pr. 580. See Sperate.

References in classic literature ?
Tom meant to reverse this image, but love is proverbially desperate in its figures of speech, and any thing was better than appearing to hesitate.
She admired Tom for his exterior, but the admiration of no moderately sensible woman could overlook rodomontade so exceedingly desperate. It was trespassing too boldly on the proprieties to utter such nonsense to a gentlewoman, and Tom, who had got his practice in a very low school, was doomed to discover that he had overreached himself.
"That 'yes' has been my bane and antidote," answered Tom, rallying for a new and still more desperate charge.
The strength of my passion is such, that I became desperate, and was resolved to try any expedient that I thought might lead to success."
I can only prevent her from taking some desperate step on her side -- some step by which she may forfeit the friendship and protection of the excellent people with whom she is now living -- by reminding her that if Mrs.
The men who stood round much approved this speech, and one of them said, "It is desperate hard, and if a man sometimes does what is wrong it is no wonder, and if he gets a dram too much who's to blow him up?"
'Wounded desperate, miss,' replied Giles, with indescribable complacency.
The mention of the thing he thought he perceived was involuntary on Sam's part at first, and his confused attempts to dissuade him he set down to a desperate lying on second thoughts, as being unwilling to implicate Liza.
Right on behind they came; and, nerved with strength such as God gives only to the desperate, with one wild cry and flying leap, she vaulted sheer over the turbid current by the shore, on to the raft of ice beyond.
With wild cries and desperate energy she leaped to another and still another cake; stumbling--leaping--slipping-- springing upwards again!
There were desperate lunges at these chosen spots seemingly every instant, and most of them were bandied like light toys between the contending forces.
At school there had been two or three girls of more boldness than modesty whom some of the boys knew; and desperate stories, due in all probability to the masculine imagination, were told of intrigues with them; but Philip had always concealed under a lofty contempt the terror with which they filled him.