Areopagite

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Areopagite

a member of the AREOPAGUS.

AREOPAGITE. A senator, or a judge of the Areopagus. Solon first established the Areopagites; although some say, they were established in the time of Cecrops, (Anno Mundi, 2553,) the year that Aaron, the brother of Moses, died; that Draco abolished the order, and Solon reestablished it. Demosthenes, in his harangue against Aristocrates, before the Areopagus, speaks of the founders of that tribunal as unknown. See Acts of the Apostles, xviii. 34.

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Thomson, The Armenian Version of the Works Attributed to Dionysius the Areopagite, Louvain, 1987, CSCO 488,489, Scriptores Armeniaci 17, 18.
500) who adopted the literary mantle of Dionysius the Areopagite, convert of St.
Scholars of philosophy and Greek language and literature present a wide ranging account of the Platonist theory and practice of prayer, from Plato himself through the Middle Platonic period down to Proclus, Damascius, and even beyond to that mysterious quasi-Platonist figure, Dionysius the Areopagite. They consider all levels of prayer from the lowest to the highest, the practice of prayer by Platonists, and the theory of gods and of language that makes prayer possible for them.
He agrees with Dionysius the Areopagite that God is a personal pre-being (ante on), while he is also the source of all being.
The introductory chapters describe the concepts and their origins in the work of Aristotle, Avicenna, and Dionysius the Areopagite, among others.
Chapter 1 surveys the varied understandings of ritual efficacy put forth by Porphyry and Iamblichus, and examines how both Neoplatonists and Christian authors such as Dionysius the Areopagite and Augustine mapped such understandings onto the categories "theurgy" and "magic." These terms should be understood as characterizations and evaluations of rituals, rather than references to specific rituals (17).
Also, the text of such a great Christian/Platonic thinker as Dionysius the Areopagite was, marvelous to say, suppressed though some unknown catastrophe, so that his doctrine was known only indirectly to later Platonists such as Plotinus, Iamblichus, and others (Ficino thus nicely solves the problem of there being no mention of pseudo-Dionysius in the work of anyone before the fifth century).
The traditional Eastern religious dialectic of form as excess (e.g., Hinduism on naming and thinking God through an excess of forms) and formlessness (e.g., Buddhism) reappears in the post-modern rethinkings and retrieval of negative theology -- as one can see in contemporary theological and philosophical retrievals of the apophatic and mystical traditions exemplified in the writings of Dionysius the Areopagite. [3]
(6.) Dionysius the Areopagite, De Caelestibus Hierarchiis, as cited by Louis Charbonneau-Lassay in his Introduction to The Bestiary of Christ, p.
Wilken), the variant streams of biblical exegesis regarding Paul and Pauline literature (Karlfried Froehlich), a renewed investigation of the interpretation of charisma vis-a-vis institution by the medieval mystic Dionysius the Areopagite (Alexander Golitzin), the boundaries of the First Testament canon in the Byzantine tradition (Harold P.
The late-fifth or early-sixth century corpus of writings probably of Syrian origin which goes under the name of pseudo-Dionysius had an enormous effect on Christian thinking for many centuries, partly of course because they masqueraded authority of their supposed author, Dionysius the Areopagite, the Athenian convert of St Paul.(1) Their authority increased when the author became conflated with the supposed evangelist of the Gauls and the first bishop of Paris.(2) The writings were also attractive because they expounded a neo-platonic mysticism.
Dionysius the Areopagite (7) and commented on by Aquinas, it prepares a natural foundation for the spiritual life and ultimately leads the mind to receive the deepest teaching of the end and purpose of man: deification and union with God.