Diplock courts

(redirected from Diplock court)
Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Diplock courts

the name given to courts in Northern Ireland in which certain terrorist offences were tried by a judge sitting without a jury. The name derives from that of the English law lord whose report in 1972 recommended their creation.
References in periodicals archive ?
perceived injustice of "Diplock courts" established to
One of the protections offered by the Diplock court system is an
of Justice, supra note 8, at 58-70 (discussing the Diplock court system's use during the cease-fire period).
Boutrab, who travelled from Dublin to Belfast by train, was the first al Qaida suspect to be tried in the North under the non-jury Diplock court system, which had only previously been used for the trial of loyalist and republican terrorists.
He added: "The Diplock court system was introduced for a specific reason but it appears that it may have continued value in combatting organised crime."
Diplock Courts." The best police officer of the UK was put in charge of the counter terrorism war and the intelligence gathering was improved to identify nab and punish the terrorists with celerity.
The Diplock courts system, as it became known, was brought in as an emergency measure in 1973.
But the Liberal Democrats expressed scepticism over the pledge on Diplock courts, saying that experience of the controversial legislation had taught them to be "extremely cautious" over such promises.
His predecessor, David Blunkett, mooted the introduction of modern day versions of the Diplock courts used to try terror suspects in Northern Ireland without a jury.
As a judge in Northern Ireland he often presided over so-called Diplock courts, where major crimes are tried by judges alone and where the prosecution is given wide latitude in the use of paid informants.
The British "Diplock Courts" are perhaps the most famous of the special anti-terrorism courts in operation.