control

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control

1) n. the power to direct, manage, oversee and/or restrict the affairs, business or assets of a person or entity. 2) v. to exercise the power of control.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
High prevalence and increasing incidence of infectious disease are the major factors driving growth of the disease control and prevention vaccine market.
Tung said that if a poultry farm notices that their birds are displaying suspicious symptoms, such as facial swelling, bleeding from the eyes and beak, lack of appetite, diarrhea, breathing problems, and sudden deaths, the livestock owner should notify the township and municipal public office or Animal Disease Control Center.
"Regardless of disease control, the burden of moderate/severe AD was higher than mild AD, suggesting a need for more effective therapies for moderate/severe disease," the authors write.
Centers for Disease Control said the Zoonotic diseases are important health concerns, and control requires collaboration between Pakistan's veterinary and human health sectors.
Droplet Precautions, Guideline for Isolation Precautions in Hospitals, Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/dhqp/ gl_isolation_droplet.html
However, on January 20 the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines for the treatment that include people exposed to HIV through unsafe sex or drug use.
(3.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Real Deal About Tobacco, 2003.
The suggestions come from the Centers on Disease Control and Prevention as well as from veteran facility operators.
Hand washing and appropriate infection control measures are an important disease control activity.
Although the Centers for Disease Control issues guidelines for the testing of various disease-causing bacteria, it has yet to issue guidance on Legionella testing.
By January of 2000, the Centers for Disease Control reported that, for the first time since the beginning of the AIDS epidemic, the majority of new HIV/AIDS cases could be found among African American and Latino men.
The Centers for Disease Control states: "N-9 can damage the cells lining the rectum, thus providing a portal of entry for HIV and other sexually transmissible agents.