disingenuity


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to disingenuity: ruly, Resemblant
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The disingenuity of those hiding behind their supposed fears of the Zika virus to cover up their complete apathy to anything that's not a Grand Slam or a Ryder Cup is boak-inducing.
But he also suggested that there has been some "disingenuity" in the portrayal of investors' plans to hold the units until death and pass them to their heirs (which would wipe out any associated tax burden).
Cultural decay was on bold display in Skilling, (19) an Enron spin-off rich in warnings about how disingenuity and outright lying increasingly threaten not just corporate governance, but the fundamental trust without which a healthy commercial and civic life cannot exist.
It smacks of disingenuity, however, to denounce D's conduct as contrived ignorance while in the same breath acquitting D of 'dishonesty or moral obliquity' in his or her dealings with P.
It's possible to read this as conservative ire that women today dither over having "too many choices." We might also see disingenuity in the way the show obviously foregrounds the pleasure and fun of identity-switching (particularly in promotional materials) while arguing the opposite in its narrative.
Its quirkiness and Tistou's disingenuity reminded me more than once of Voltaire's Candide--a satire, very much in the French tradition.
There is something extremely provocative lurking within Levinson's critique of the rights/remedy split, his concern for the opacity and disingenuity of substantive adjudication, and his turn toward countersequentialism as a way of exposing the normative underpinnings of a court's decisions.
I return to this letter, and its more fundamental disingenuity, at the end of this article in n.
Even if we accept that reducing agency misrepresentation of science is a laudable goal in its own right, there are reasons why Watts's proposal might actually promote such disingenuity. A fairly common explanation for an agency being less than truthful about scientific and technical matters is to avoid adverse political ramifications.
Instead, they are slippery, cagey, and protean, and reflect the uncertainty and disingenuity of the real world.
Either way, this disingenuity towards Islamic beliefs is noticeable not only in the case of Malkam but also Mostashar al-Dowleh who, as will be seen in the next section, wrote the first treatise on Islamic human rights.
We need an end to this affected disingenuity and a bit more transparency from letter writers with a political axe to grind.