disorder

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disorder

a disturbance of public order or peace. Its existence may trigger extended police powers.
References in periodicals archive ?
All the results of the study said that dissociative disorder are not caused by fantasy at all and are all responses to severe trauma.
The early stages of progressive neurological disorders, such as multiple sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus, can be misdiagnosed with dissociative disorders (3).
Berkowitz et al., "Dissociative disorders in psychiatric inpatients," The American Journal of Psychiatry, vol.
developed a brief scale, which proved to be useful for screening dissociative disorders. By using regression analysis methods, they identified five SDQ-20 items (items 4, 8, 13, 15, and 18) that provided optimal discrimination between dissociative disorders and other mental disorders, constituting the SDQ-5.
In conclusion, comorbid psychiatric diagnosis is common in patients with CD, and the rate of comorbid dissociative disorders is very high.
Like in other psychiatric disorders, co-morbidity is often found in dissociative disorder. Results of many research studies have shown that anxiety, depression and panic disorder are the most commonly occurring co-morbid disorders with dissociative disorder.
Another study conducted in patients reporting to Pakistan Ordnance Factories (POF) Wah hospital showed that the commonest presentation of dissociative disorders was dissociative anesthesia and sensory loss 38 (38%) followed by dissociative disorder unspecified 30 (30%) with features similar to mania and psychosis11.
Scores over 30 indicate dissociative disorder. In a validity and reliability study performed in Turkey, high internal consistency was found based on the reliability of the scale (Cronbach alpha = 0.91) and test-retest correlation (r = 0.78) (8).
An Update on Assessment, Treatment, and Neurobiological Research in Dissociative Disorders as We Move Toward the DSM-5,” is written by a team of leading mental health professionals, many members of or advisors to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Spectrum, Post-Traumatic, and Dissociative Disorders Work Group.
[3] Rarely, typical symptoms of dissociative disorders may occur during epileptic attacks, but among epileptic patients with dissociative symptoms, only a minority have concomittant dissociative disorders.
DID falls in the section of dissociative disorders in the DSM-IV-TR; as the section title suggests, the key clinical feature is dissociation (APA, 2000), which is defined as "a psychological state in which the individual's level of consciousness is altered" and for those who have experienced it, it is described as "being separated from their body, 'zoned out,' floating above or apart from the body, detached" (Stickley & Nickeas, 2006, p.