disturbance

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disturbance

noun affray, agitation, annoyance, anxiety, anxiousness, commotion, confusion, discomfiture, discomposure, disconcertion, discontinuity, dishevelment, dislocation, disorder, displacement, disquiet, disquietude, eruption, faction, ferment, fomentation, fracas, fuss, hindrance, inquietude, interruption, intrusion, maelstrom, misarrangement, misgiving, molestation, motus, quandary, rebellion, restiveness, restlessness, revolt, revolution, state of disorder, trepidation, tumult, tumultus, turbatio, turbulence, turmoil, unrest, unruliness, uprising, uproar
Associated concepts: creating a disturbance, disorderly connuct, disturbance of court, disturbance of possession, dissurbance of quiet possession, disturbing the peace
See also: affray, altercation, belligerency, bluster, brawl, cataclysm, commotion, confusion, consternation, detriment, disorder, dispute, embarrassment, embroilment, fracas, fray, furor, imbroglio, insurrection, molestation, nuisance, outbreak, outburst, outcry, pandemonium, panic, phobia, riot, trouble, turmoil, violation

DISTURBANCE, torts. A wrong done to an incorporeal hereditament, by hindering or disquieting the owner in the enjoyment of it. Finch. L. 187; 3 Bl. Com. 235; 1 Swift's Dig. 522; Com. Dig. Action upon the case for a disturbance, Pleader, 3 I 6; 1 Serg. & Rawle, 298.

References in periodicals archive ?
25 ha of a temperate deciduous forest by using aerial photographs gives a reliable estimate of the disturbance regime of the forest.
The disturbance regime of these forests is thus characterized by small-scale, low-intensity disturbances that are dispersed in time and space and that occur through a diversity of processes that vary in their structural consequences to the forest.
However, the successional processes occurring after disturbance are in general not treated as being dependent on the spatial structure of the system or of the disturbance regime (although see Lawton and Putz 1988, Coffin and Lauenroth 1989, Frelich et al.
Di Stefano J and York A (2012) Relationships between Disturbance Regimes and Biodiversity: Background, Issues and Approaches for Monitoring.
These issues call for more paleoecological and long-term studies in relatively undisturbed forests that can serve as controls against which the effects of modified or novel disturbance regimes can be assessed.
Restoration of historical disturbance regimes may be necessary to maintain or reintroduce some degree of pine canopy dominance (and attendant habitat value) in these coastal forests.
The greatest area requirements generally arise from the objective of maintaining natural disturbance regimes.
In this paper, we specifically ask, what are the traits of ant species underlying their adaptation to different stress and disturbance regimes and changes in these stress and disturbance regimes?
Species within ecosystems evolved under such disturbance regimes and would be expected to have adapted to it as long as the regime continues to be within its "natural" range of variability.
This book provides a general consensus on three key issues: 1) Our forest management practices have altered natural disturbance regimes, and the debate over the definition of "natural" will continue; 2) The issue of altered natural disturbance regimes needs to be addressed by both forest managers and researchers; and 3) Emulating natural disturbances is a possible management paradigm to address inadequate forest management practices.
The relative effects of anthropogenic disturbance must be distinguished from the ranges of variation in natural disturbance regimes, but because of the large size and variability of coastal ecosystems, manipulative experiments to untangle the complexities of the varying disturbance regimes are difficult except on a relatively small scale.
The 20 LTER sites (Waide & Lugo, 1992) contain years, even decades, of successional studies in ecosystems over a large range of worldwide environmental gradients and disturbance regimes (Holdridge, 1947).