Divine Right of Kings

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Divine Right of Kings

The authority of a monarch to rule a realm by virtue of birth.

The concept of the divine right of kings, as postulated by the patriarchal theory of government, was based upon the laws of God and nature. The king's power to rule was derived from his ancestors who, as monarchs, were appointed to serve by God. Regardless of mis-conduct, a king or his heir could not be forced to forfeit the right to the obedience of subjects or the right to succeed to the throne. This concept was formulated to dispel any possibility of papal and ecclesiastical claims to supremacy in secular as well as spiritual matters.

References in periodicals archive ?
Absolutism, whether in terms of the divine right of kings or of emergency exceptions for the Weimar Republic, becomes the clear result.
We might call it our modern version of the divine right of kings.
He captures the Byzantine quality of the court of James I where the monarch displayed, on the one hand, a rare capacity for intellectual engagement as the author of a celebrated treatise on the divine right of kings, and, on the other hand, a prurience that overturned the established decencies of the royal household:
He praised The Lion King and Forrest Gump, films that promote, respectively, the divine right of kings and stupidity as a survival tactic.
Thank heaven that at least we don't have to put up with the divine right of kings any more.
If you buy into the hogwash of the divine right of kings, then you should also buy into the fact that insignificant trolls like us have no right to question such a system.
The Divine Right of the public thus goes farther than the Divine Right of kings.
Constitutional corruption and legislative/executive/citizen acquiescence have put us back where we started 228 years ago, face to face with "the divine right of kings.
But he was always arrogant and aloof and his belief in the divine right of kings, inherited from his father, further removed him from his people.
50) Charles McIlwain found it "the most comprehensive of all [James's] political writings,"(51) while Wilfrid Harrison doubted "to what extent a significant doctrine of the divine right of kings is to be found in King James's not too coherent book.
In this landmark ruling, the highest court in the land reaffirmed the basic American principle that no individual, including the president, is above the law and that the theory of the divine right of kings does not apply to the chief executive in an American constitutional democracy.
Though the divine right of kings has long since gone the way of the fairy story, sadly our country is still lumbered with an unelected royal family who expect deference and loyalty from the people.