Dote

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DOTE, Span. law. The property which the wife gives to the husband on account of marriage.
     2. It is divided into adventitia and profectitia; the former is the dote which the father or grandfather, or other of the ascendants in the direct paternal line, give of their own property to the husband; the latter (adventitia) is that property which the wife gives to the husband, or that which is given to him for her by her mother, or her collateral relations, or a stranger. Aso & Man. Inst. B. 1, t. 7, c . 1, Sec. i.

References in periodicals archive ?
The firm recently advised Claverley Group on the sale of News Shops to the Midland Co-operative, and also advised PR agency Freshwater on its pounds 10 million Aim doat.
Being desirous to introduce his bride into his lodge in the manner which should be least offensive to the mother of his children, for whom he still retained much regard, he introduced the subject in these words: "You know," said he, "that I love no woman so fondly as I doat upon you.
These doat on men, and some on boys,/ And quite abandon female joys" (42).
Tis not his Face; I've sence enough to see, That is not good, though doated on by me: Nor is't his Tongue, that has this Conquest won; For that at least is equall'd by my own; His Carriage can to none obliging be, "Tis Rude, Affected, full of Vanity: Strangely Ill-natur'd, Peevish, and Unkind, Unconstant, False, to Jealousie inclin'd; His Temper cou'd not have so great a Pow'r, 'Tis mutable, and changes every hour: Those vigorous Years that Women so Adore, Are past in him; he's twice my Age and more; And yet I love this false, this worthless Man, With all the Passion that a Woman can; Doat on his Imperfections, though I spy Nothing to Love; I Love, and know not why.
Tis not his Face; I've sence enough to see, That is not good, though doated on by me: Nor is't his Tongue, that has this Conquest won; For that at least is equall'd by my own: His Carriage can to none obliging be, 'Tis Rude, Affected, full of Vanity: Strangely Ill-natur'd, Peevish, and Unkind, Unconstant, False, to Jealousie inclin'd; His Temper cou'd not have so great a Pow'r, 'Tis mutable, and changes every hour: Those vigorous Years that Women so Adore, Are past in him; he's twice my Age and more; And yet I love this false, this worthless Man, With all the Passion that a Woman can; Doat on his Imperfections, though I spy Nothing to Love; I Love, and know not why.
Do you know "Mairzy doats and dozy doats/And liddle lamzy divey /A kiddley divey too, /Wooden shoe?
Eliot to high school romance, from childhood misery and the joys of maturity to the neon lights of Tokyo, from The Tempest to "Mairzy doats and dozy doats and liddle lamzy divey," a song that clogged the airways in 1943, entered my unprotected brain and has not yet had the grace to go the way of "treadmill.