dominant

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Dominant

Prevalent; paramount in force or effect; of primary importance or consideration. That which is dominant possesses rights that prevail over those of others.

In Property Law, the estate to which an Easement, or right of use, is given is called the dominant tenement or estate, and the one upon which the easement is imposed is called the servient tenement or estate.

dominant

adjective ascendant, authoritative, chief, commanding, controlling, eminent, first, governing, hegemonical, influential, leading, main, master, overshadowing, paramount, predominant, preeminent, preponderant, prepotent, prevalent, primary, prime, principal, regnant, ruling, sovereign, superior, supreme, unsurpassed, weighty
Associated concepts: dominant aspect rule, dominant essate, dominant land, dominant party, dominant right, dommnant tenant, serviant land
See also: absolute, cardinal, causative, central, compelling, considerable, current, essential, forcible, influential, leading, master, omnipotent, outstanding, potent, powerful, predominant, prevailing, prevalent, primary, prime, principal, rampant, rife, salient, sovereign, stellar

DOMINANT. estates. In the civil law, this term is used to signify the estate to which a servitude or easement is due from another estate; for example, where the owners of the estate, Blackacre, have a right of way or passage over the estate Whiteacre, the former is called the dominant, and the latter the servient estate. Bouv. Inst. n. 1600.

References in classic literature ?
Firmly narrowing upward from this wealthy but inconspicuous substratum was the compact and dominant group which the Mingotts, Newlands, Chiverses and Mansons so actively represented.
Here they are the dominant race--we are the 'monsters'--the lower orders.
The dominant race of Pellucidar, David, have not yet learned that men converse among themselves, or reason.
The next day, with no very definite intention, with no dominant feeling that he could rightly have named, he again sought the spot.
The process of diffusion may often be very slow, being dependent on climatal and geographical changes, or on strange accidents, but in the long run the dominant forms will generally succeed in spreading.
Dominant species spreading from any region might encounter still more dominant species, and then their triumphant course, or even their existence, would cease.
Thus, as it seems to me, the parallel, and, taken in a large sense, simultaneous, succession of the same forms of life throughout the world, accords well with the principle of new species having been formed by dominant species spreading widely and varying; the new species thus produced being themselves dominant owing to inheritance, and to having already had some advantage over their parents or over other species; these again spreading, varying, and producing new species.
This poem, with its Gallic brilliancy and audacity, long exercised over Chaucer's mind the same dominant influence which it possessed over most secular poets of the age.
There is much interest in the question often raised whether, if he had lived in an age like the Elizabethan, when the drama was the dominant literary form, he too would have been a dramatist.
The dominant primordial beast was strong in Buck, and under the fierce conditions of trail life it grew and grew.
Buck stood and looked on, the successful champion, the dominant primordial beast who had made his kill and found it good.
I had an instinct for proportion myself, and I collapsed forthwith, descending from the dominant pose of a master of matter to a state of humble confusion which was, to say the least, very miserable.