Driver

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DRIVER. One employed in conducting a coach, carriage, wagon, or other vehicle, with horses, mules, or other animals.
     2. Frequent accidents occur in consequence of the neglect or want of skill of drivers of public stage coaches, for which the employers are responsible.
     3. The law requires that a driver should possess reasonable skill and be of good habits for the journey; if, therefore, he is not acquainted with the road he undertakes to drive; 3 Bingh. Rep. 314, 321; drives with reins so loose that he cannot govern his horses; 2 Esp. R. 533; does not give notice of any serious danger on the road; 1 Camp. R. 67; takes the wrong side of the road; 4 Esp. R. 273; incautiously comes in collision with another carriage; 1 Stark. R. 423; 1 Campb. R. 167; or does not exercise a sound and reasonable discretion in travelling on the road, to avoid dangers and difficulties, and any accident happens by which any passenger is injured, both the driver and his employers will be responsible. 2 Stark. R. 37; 3 Engl. C. L. Rep. 233; 2 Esp. R. 533; 11. Mass. 57; 6 T. R. 659; 1 East, R. 106; 4 B. & A. 590; 6 Eng. C. L. R. 528; 2 Mc Lean, R. 157. Vide Common carriers Negligence; Quasi Offence.

References in periodicals archive ?
The testing facility at Shilin Technology Park for driverless cars and related technology is expected to be completed in the coming weeks, and will be put to use in 2018.
More dangerous are the driverless trucks they are testing on motorways.
Personally, I'm not convinced about driverless vehicles.
GM's autonomous division, Cruise Automation, had a test fleet of around 40 driverless cars just a few months ago, but that count now stands at 100.
So driverless cars promise a future of faster journey times with much reduced environmental impacts.
The RAC found that 40 per cent of motorists believe the chance of there being one million driverless vehicles on the UK's roads by 2037 is a bit pie in the sky and 17 per cent believe they will not live long enough to see that landmark reached.
We are assured that, in the glorious future, driverless cars will save lives, reduce accidents, ease congestion, curb energy consumption, and lower harmful emissions.
The project, described as the most complex autonomous vehicle trial anywhere in the world, will culminate in driverless cars travelling from London to Oxford on the M40 by 2019.
A recent Department for Transport report espoused how improved traffic flow in a driverless world could reduce delays by 40 per cent, while providing vast new opportunities for people with reduced mobility.
After its driverless car crashed three days ago in Arizona, followed by a suspension of its self-driving programme, Uber's autonomous cars are back on the road.
Uber, the popular ride-sharing service, has became the first to publicly launch driverless cars.