Dog

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DOG. A well known domestic animal. In almost all languages this word is, a term or name of contumely or reproach. See 3 Bulst. 226; 2 Mod. 260; 1 Leo. 148; and the title action on the case for defamation in the Digests; Minsheu's Dictionary.
     2. A dog is said at common law to have no intrinsic value, and he cannot therefore be the subject of larceny. 4 Bl. Com. 236; 8 Serg. & Rawle, 571. But the owner has such property in him, that he may maintain trespass for an injury to his dog; "for a man may have property in some things which are of so base nature that no felony can be committed of them, as of a bloodhound or mastiff." 12 H. VIII. 3; 18 H. VIII. 2; 7 Co. 18 a; Com. Dig. Biens, F; 2 Bl. Com. 397; Bac. Ab. Trover, D; F. N. B. 86; Bro. Trespass, pl. 407 Hob. 283; Cro. Eliz. 125; Cro. Jac. 463 2 Bl. Rep.
     3. Dogs, if dangerous animals, may lawfully be killed, when their ferocity is known to their owner, or in self-defence 13 John. R. 312; 10 John. R. 365; and when bitten by a rabid animal, a dog may be lawfully killed by any one. 13 John. R. 312.
     4. When a dog, in consequence of his vicious habits, becomes a common nuisance, the owner may be indicted. And when he commits an injury, if the owner had a knowledge of his mischievous propensity, he is liable to an action on the case. Bull. N. P. 77; 2 Str. 1264; Lord Raym. 110. 1 B. & A. 620; 4 Camp. R. 198; 2 Esp. R. 482; 4 Cowen, 351; 6 S. & R. 36; Addis. R. 215; 1 Scam. 492 23 Wend 354; 17 Wend. 496; 4 Dev. & Batt. 146.
     5. A man has a right to keep a dog to guard his premises, but not to put him at the entrance of his house, because a person coming there on lawful business may be injured by him, and this, though there may be another entrance to the house. 4 C. & P. 297; 6 C. & P. 1. But if a dog be chained, and a visitor so incautiously go near him that he is bitten, he has no right of action against the owner. 3 Chit. Bl. 154, n. 7. Vide Animal; Knowledge; Scienter.

References in periodicals archive ?
This conflict between past and present identities is reinforced, within the economy of the novel, through the presence of Jamaican spirits, or duppies. Duppies are central to the obeah religion of Jamaica and are traditionally "called or summoned as helpers in the process of revealing mysteries, affording protection, or inflicting harm" (Fernandez Olmos and Paravisini-Gebert 170).
Unlike their other duppies that inhabit the clock tower and the hills, he is posited as something of a savior: the prophet who returns to save his people and can walk among them.
This shows that fire in Nyahbinghi has a symbolic and utilitarian significance, representing a process of purification and cleansing of duppies (evil forces) for the members.
Brown's poetry collection Duppies (1996), Jean Rhys's Wide Sargasso Sea (1966), Nalo Hopkinson's "The Glass Bottle Trick" (from her 2001 collection, Skin Folk), Dionne Brand's "Blossom, Priestess of Oya, Goddess of Winds, Storms, and Waterfalls" (from Sans Souci and Other Stories [1989]), and Shani Mootoo's Cereus Blooms at Night (1996).