Ecclesiastical Courts


Also found in: Dictionary, Wikipedia.

Ecclesiastical Courts

In England, the collective classification of particular courts that exercised jurisdiction primarily over spiritual matters. A system of courts, held by authority granted by the sovereign, that assumed jurisdiction over matters concerning the ritual and religion of the established church, and over the rights, obligations, and discipline of the clergy.

ECCLESIASTICAL COURTS. English law. Courts held by the king's authority as supreme governor of the church, for matters which chiefly concern religion.
     2. There are ten courts which may be ranged under this class. 1. The Archdeacon's Court. 2. The Consistory Court. 3. The Court of Arches. 4. The Court of Peculiars. 5. The Prerogative Court. 6. The Court of Delegates, which is the great court of appeals in all ecclesiastical causes. 7. The Court of Convocation. 8. The Court of Audience. 9. The Court of Faculties. 10. The Court of Commissioners of Review.

References in periodicals archive ?
Both civil courts and ecclesiastical courts sanctioned "separation from bed and board," that is a legal separation, but civil courts had no authority to terminate a marriage, and ecclesiastical courts refused to do so (Blackstone 428); therefore, separated spouses remained legally wed, and neither man nor wife could remarry.
Brundage is primarily interested in the period 1150-1250, when the practice of canon law in the ecclesiastical courts became a full fledged profession.
Common Law increasingly challenged the jurisdiction of the ecclesiastical courts, especially after the Reformation, during which a penitential theology of shrift, good deeds, and mercy gave way to a Protestant theology of self-examination and repentance.
Before 1858 all wills were proved by ecclesiastical courts.
The lack of legal representation for the parties involved in ecclesiastical courts will create problems for the people who want a divorce, because they will be left unaided to the judgement of some priests.
Margaret's over the parishioners of the latter's rights and duties to the former, legal cases involving baptism, churching, marriage, mortuaries, funerals, and burials, jurisdictional overlaps between secular and ecclesiastical courts and how lay persons might try to exploit them, and the licensing and maintaining of hermits and administration of hermitages.
They had been charged under Section Two of the 1860 Ecclesiastical Courts Jurisdiction Act, which says it is an offence to disrupt a cathedral service.
The archbishop noted that "the law of the Church of England is the law of the land" there; indeed, ecclesiastical courts that once handled marriage and divorce are still integrated into the British legal system, deciding matters of church property and doctrine.
They were swiftly arrested by police officers under Section two of the 1860 Ecclesiastical Courts Jurisdiction Act, which says it is an offence to disrupt a cathedral service.
12) The ecclesiastical courts were the most obvious forum for dispute in a moral issue such as spousal desertion; nevertheless, cases relating to this matter also appear in secular courts, both royal and manorial.
Michael Smith's long service in the ministry was in academia as well as in the pastorate, and one of his primary studies was the history of the ecclesiastical courts of England and Wales.