bond

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bond

n. 1) written evidence of debt issued by a company with the terms of payment spelled out. A bond differs from corporate shares of stock since bond payments are pre-determined and provide a final pay-off date, while stock dividends vary depending on profitability and corporate decisions to distribute. There are two types of such bonds: "registered" in which the name of the owner is recorded by the company and "bearer" in which interest payments are made to whomever is holding the bond. 2) written guaranty or pledge which is purchased from a bonding company (usually an insurance firm) or by an individual as security (called a "bondsman") to guarantee some form of performance, including showing up in court ("bail bond"), properly complete construction or other contract terms ("performance bond"), that the bonded party will not steal or mismanage funds, that a purchased article is the real thing, or that title is good. If there is a failure then the bonding company will make good up to the amount of the bond.

bond

a written acknowledgment of an obligation to pay a sum or to perform a contract. A legal tie.

BOND, contract. An obligation or bond is a deed whereby the obligor, obliges himself, his heirs, executors and administrators, to pay a certain sum of money to another at a day appointed. But see 2 Shepl. 185. If this be all, the bond is called a single one, simplex obligatio; but there is generally a condition added, that if the obligor pays a smaller sum, or does, or omits to do some particular act, the obligation shall be void. 2 Bl. Com. 840. The word bond ex vi termini imports a sealed instrument. 2 S. & R. 502; 1 Bald. R. 129; 2 Porter, R. 19; 1 Blackf. R. 241; Harp. R. 434; 6 Verm. R. 40. See Condition; Interest of money; Penalty. It is proposed to consider: 1. The form of a bond, namely, the words by which it may be made, and the ceremonies required. 2. The condition. 3. The performance or discharge.
     2.- I. 1. There must be parties to a bond, an obligor and obligee : for where a bond was made with condition that the obligor should pay twenty pounds to such person or persons; as E. H. should, by her last will and testament in writing, name and appoint the same to be paid, and E. H. did not appoint any person to, whom the same should be paid, it was held that the money was not payable to the executors of E. H. Hob. 9. No particular form of words are essential to create an obligation, but any words which declare the intention of the parties, and denote that one is bound to the other, will be sufficient, provided the ceremonies mentioned below have been observed. Shep. Touch. 367-8; Bac. Abr. Obligations, B; Com. Dig. Obligations, B 1.
     3. - 2. It must be in writing, on paper or parchment, and if it be made on other materials it is void. Bac. Abr. Obligations, A.
     4. - 3. It must be sealed, though it is not necessary that it should be mentioned in the writing that it is sealed. As to what is a sufficient sealing, see the above case, and the word Seal.
     5. - 4. It must be delivered by the party whose bond it is, to the other. Bac. Abr. Obligations, C. But the delivery and acceptance may be by attorney. The date is not considered of the substance of a deed, and therefore a bond which either has no date or an impossible one is still good, provided the real day of its being dated or given, that is, delivered, can be proved. 2 Bl. Com. 304; Com. Dig. Fait, B 3; 3 Call, 309. See Date.
     6. - II. The condition is either for the payment of money, or for the performance of something else. In the latter case, if the condition be against some rule of law merely, positively impossible at the time of making it, uncertain or insensible, the condition alone is void, and the bond shall stand single and unconditional; for it is the folly of the obligor to enter into such an obligation, from which he can never be released. If it be to do a thing malum in se, the obligation itself is void, the whole contract being unlawful. 2 Bl. Com. 340; Bac. Abr. Conditions, K, L; Com. Dig. Conditions, D 1, D 2, D 3, D 7, D 8.
     7. - III. 1. When, by the condition of an obligation, the act to be done to the obligee is of its own nature transitory, as payment of money, delivery of charters, or the like, and no time is limited, it ought to be performed in convenient time. 6 Co. 31 Co. Lit. 208; Roll. Abr. 436.
     8. - 2. A payment before the day is good; Co. Lit. 212, a; or before action brought. 10 Mass. 419; 11 Mass. 217.
     9. - 3. If the condition be to do a thing within a certain time, it may be performed the last day of the time appointed. Bac. Abr. Conditions, P 3.
    10. - 4. If the condition be to do an act, without limiting any time, he who has the benefit may do it at what time he pleases. Com. Dig. Conditions, G 3.
    11. - 5. When the place where the act to be performed is agreed upon, the party who is to perform it, is not obliged to seek the opposite party elsewhere; nor is he to whom it is to be performed bound to accept of the performance in another place. Roll. 445, 446 Com. Dig. Conditions, G 9 Bac. Abr. Conditions, P 4. See Performance.
    12. - 6. For what amounts to a breach of a condition in a bond see Bac. Abr. Conditions, 0; Com. Dig. Conditions, M; and this Dict. tit. Breach.

References in periodicals archive ?
My only disappointment is that Dramatic Strategies in the Plays of Edward Bond fails to provide a systematic study of the development of Bond's critical vocabulary.
As Edward Bond's The War Plays draws to a close, the Fourth Woman says: "We don't learn from other people's mistakes--not even from most of our own.
The 30-year-old is a member of Big Brum Theatre Company and will be appearing in the Edward Bond play, Eleven Vests, at The Other Place in Stratford from October 21 as part of the Royal Shakespeare Company's Autumn Visitors Season.
Edward Bond and Harold Pinter came of age in the same theatrical generation, part of the explosion of new drama that followed in the wake of the Berliner Ensemble's 1956 London tour, of John Osborne's celebrated Look Back in Anger (1956) and The Entertainer (1957), of the development of new playwrights at the Royal Court, of the state and local subsidies that made theater one of Britain's most visible (and exportable) cultural commodities in the postwar period.
Edward Bond's two most recent plays, Jackets and In the Company of Men, have been published by Methuen (and in France by Arche) as two "Postmodern" plays along with eighty-two "Notes on Post-Modernism" by their author.
Dear's Sarak Sprackling has a strong family resemblence to the figure of the young wooman arsonist in Edward Bond's play about Shakespear, Bingo.
Afterwards, the play's author, Edward Bond, will speak.
That will be followed in January by Edward Bond's "The Sea," a little-seen, morally complex comedy of insular village life.
Two weeks ago, theatre-in-education company Big Brum celebrated its 25th anniversary, with the premiere of its sixth play by Edward Bond, one of Britain's most original and celebrated postwar playwrights, who now chooses to write for schoolchildren here.
Strathcona Theatre Company retells the legend of Robin Hood in Hood, and Big Brum Theatre Company performs Edward Bond's black comedy Eleven Vests.
More immediately, there is nothing in Sarah Kane's output to date that one couldn't associate with such prior Court grandees as Howard Barker and Edward Bond, the latter of whom, appropriately, was among the greatest champions of Blasted.
Interestingly and productively, Mengel concentrates not so much on literal translations as on the rendering of German dramas into English by British playwrights, most of them contemporary, most of them outstanding dramatists in their own right: Stephen Spender (Schiller's Maria Stuart), John Arden (Goethe's Gotz von Berlichingen), John Mortimer (Zuckmayer's Der Hauptman von Kopenick), Charles Marowitz (Bu chner's Woyzeck), Edward Bond (Wedekind's Fruhlings Erwachen), Tom Stoppard (Schnitzler's Das weite Land and Liebelei, and Nestroy's Einen Jux will er sich machen), and Howard Brenton (Brecht's Leben des Galilei and Buchner's Dantons Tod).