emergence

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emergence

noun appearance, arrival, commencement, development, evidence, initiation, issue, manifestation, notice, now apparent, show, start
Associated concepts: emergent law, the emergence of law
See also: egress, expression, issuance, manifestation, nascency, origination, outflow, start
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the destruction of the fuel cladding should be considered as the emergent properties effect, i.
But what reason is there, in general, for supposing that a suitable discourse context is available whenever a metaphor with emergent properties is uttered?
All this is familiar to those who speak of emergent properties and nonreductive physicalism; the difference is, however, that Aristotle and Aquinas have a more comprehensive philosophy of nature, which can make sense of these phenomena.
We state that by using assistance and scaffolding mechanisms the dialogue between the learner and the m-assessment system can be mediated but some emergent properties have to be considered in order to guarantee the success of the activity.
In systems theory, emergent properties refer to those properties of a system that arise out of more fundamental entities, yet are not reducible to the properties of those lower-level entities.
making it counterproductive to analyze in an isolated matter as the relationship between these factors produces emergent properties.
This leads to 'incoherence' (100): emergent properties logically supervene upon their base, while at the same time they are not logically deducible from their base.
One solution is to bring in complexity, possibly along the lines of my discussion of complex systems and emergent properties (see Walter 2002).
Emergent properties cannot be predicted by studying isolated components.
Chapters describe how to identify cellular components, interactions among these components, and quantitative approaches to analyze and model interactions, emergent properties, and dynamics of the networks.
James Lovelock's Gaia Theory fitted well with Teddy's ideas on the emergent properties of systems and as Jim lived near Camelford, where we were at the time publishing The Ecologist, we decided to hold a symposium on the implications of the Gaia Theory for ecology and the environment.