employer

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employer

n. a person or entity which hires the services of another. (See: employee, principal)

employer

noun administrator, boss, chief, controller, director, executive, head, leader, management, manager, master, overseer, owner, patron, proprietor, superior, supervisor, taskmaster
Associated concepts: employers' liability acts
See also: chief, director, executive, principal

EMPLOYER. One who has engaged or hired the services of another. He is entitled to rights and bound to perform duties.
     2.-1. His rights are, to be served according to the terms of the contract. 2. He has a right against third persons for an injury to the person employed, or for harboring him, so as to deprive the employer of his services. 2 Bouv. Inst. n. 2295.
     3. His duties are to pay the workman the compensation agreed upon, or if there be no special agreement, such just recompense as he deserves. Vide Hire; Hirer.

References in periodicals archive ?
LOS ANGELES -- Results from the Eighth Annual Transamerica Retirement Survey revealed major differences in how employers and their employees view the importance of retirement benefits.
Because gain on the conversion of a capital or ordinary income asset produces the same tax result, corporate employers may be indifferent as to characterization.
Law enforcement employers must consider factors, such as time spent on leave, time spent on call, and time spent training when determining whether an employee has worked the requisite number of hours.
Employers currently may require pre-employment physicals to determine if an employee is able to physically perform their job.
Facts: In the case, the employer contracted with an RSC to assist in selling employees' residences.
A recent survey by the International Foundation of Employee Benefit Plans said that nearly two-thirds of employers offer some type of wellness program.
In the first scenario the employee effectively sells the residence to the employer via the relocation company; the buyout price is generally the average of two or three appraisals.
Employers have been held to a strict standard of liability, referred to as vicarious liability, for the sexually harassing conduct of supervisors, enabling employees alleging they were the victims of sexual harassment to hold employers liable without the need to establish knowledge or constructive knowledge of the offending conduct and failure to remedy it on the part of the employer.
1, enacted last year as AB 1825, requires employers with 50 or more workers to provide a minimum of two hours of anti-harassment training and education to all supervisors by Jan.
The smallest employers generally are keeping costs down by discouraging coverage of dependents and imposing high deductibles.
Even IRS regulations describe differential payments to military personnel as "compensation paid by other employers.

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