Enfeoffment


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Enfeoffment

Also known as feoffment. Complete surrender and transfer of all land ownership rights from one person to another. In old English Law, an enfeoffment was a transfer of property by which the new owner was given both the right to sell the land and the right to pass it on to heirs, evidenced by livery of seisin, a ceremony for transferring the possession of real property from one individual to another.

See: alienation
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References in periodicals archive ?
(17) With Choyong's enfeoffment, the short-lived state of Chinguk came to an end; in its place stood the kingdom of Parhae, a minor satellite that did not possess formal statehood in the eyes of the Tang empire, but one that was determined nonetheless to pursue an independent foreign policy.
The arrival in July 1482 of a Siamese mission in Beijing "to request enfeoffment for their ruler" again suggests a change of ruler in the preceding few years.
It relates to the envoy who was sent to carry out the "enfeoffment" rites for this new ruler -- the Supervising Secretary Lin Xiao.
However, an MSL reference dated five years later (1487) suggests something more behind the dispute: "Recently, there were differences between the language of the gold-leaf memorial by which enfeoffment was requested and the tally-slips and despatch note provided.
The Shandong Provincial Museum curator, among others, opines that Zhu Tan's enfeoffment in 1385 signifies the terminus ante quem for the siyin seal on the three buried paintings.
Duke Zhuang refuses this enfeoffment, but overrides an advisor's admonition to give Duan an alternate city because "Lady Jiang [his mother] desires it" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
11); (ii) tying the five planets and their associated terrestrial regions to stellar locations; (iii) the regular system of allocating the twenty-eight lunar mansions among the terrestrial polities; (iv) defining the astral correlate of an ancient feudatory as the celestial location of Jupiter at the time of enfeoffment; (v) identifying the celestial correlate of a locality as the asterism to which ancient inhabitants of that place principally offered sacrifice.
Zhu Yuanzhang, who became the first Ming emperor, and Xu Da were close friends, and although much of Xu's life was spent elsewhere, his enfeoffment established his family in Nanjing.