Entitlement

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Entitlement

An individual's right to receive a value or benefit provided by law.

Commonly recognized entitlements are benefits, such as those provided by Social Security or Workers' Compensation.

See: birthright, certification, charter, consent, droit, due, fitness, freedom, license, privilege, qualification, right, sanction, title
References in periodicals archive ?
The protection of employee entitlements has been an issue of public policy debate following several major corporate failures including HIH and Ansett.
During the transition period to flat-rate payments, current farmers would be paid according to the number of entitlements they hold, and a proportion of their original value, plus an amount proportional to the amount of land they declare and the regional flat-rate.
It's possible we're seeing more sales activity simply because farmers are becoming more aware they can trade entitlements," he said.
The unfortunate truth is that, in the last few month, newspapers have run many stories of workers losing their jobs and their accrued entitlements, when a business fails.
Q I AM a tractor-loving farmer and need some advice regarding my entitlement to drive heavy goods vehicles.
Ministers have responded to concerns about the proposal to increase the statutory holiday entitlement by delaying the introduction of the full increase, according to MFG Solicitors' head of employment law.
You also need to clarify what your award entitlements to annual leave and sick leave are or, if not sure, ring the Association and ask to speak to an Information Officer.
In addition, control policies such as those related to segregation of duties or entitlement re-certifications can be managed more easily through policy-based automation.
We are collecting entries of entitlements and are expecting a large amount of interest nationwide as this is a new asset with a value that has yet to be determined.
On entitlements, there is a sense among members of Paulson's team at Treasury that they may be able to succeed where Bush failed.
Perhaps it's becoming possible (without ducking for cover) to publicly discuss major reductions in entitlements, which were believed to be the "third rail" of American politics as recently as a few months ago.
Peck: Still, the argument is made that people had better start thinking about private financing alternatives government entitlements in general are on the way out.