excerption


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
See: excerpt
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, Gordimer's prose does not lend itself to pithy excerption. There is a thematic sprawl to her fiction; at its most effective, it appears as a dumping ground for description, where detail mounts upon detail as she refused to lose patience with material which would otherwise be lost as unspeakably, invisibly mundane.
Michael Pilkington's version of Galliard is not a "primary source," nor is it an edition; it is an excerption and retranslation, some might say bowdlerization.
Happily, Nettl's format submits to rearrangement (and excerption) quite easily, which will be helpful for classroom use.
The progression of chapters follows this model, starting with the book's conception and compilation of documentary materials (chapter 1), moving next to its physical production and print history (chapter 2), and finally to the woodcut illustrations and paratextual materials that sought to direct the understanding of early modern readers and, no less importantly, the response of readers themselves in annotations, excisions, excerptions, even in the candle wax and nutshells they left within the book's folds.