Fair Labor Standards Act

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Fair Labor Standards Act

The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29U.S.C.A. § 201 et seq.) was federal legislation enacted in 1938 by Congress, pursuant to its power under the Commerce Clause, that mandated a Minimum Wage and maximum 40-hour work week for employees of those businesses engaged in interstate commerce.

Popularly known as the "Wages and Hours Law," the Fair Labor Standards Act was one of a number of statutes making up the New Deal program of the presidential administration of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Aside from setting a maximum number of hours that a person could work for the minimum wage, it also established the right of the eligible worker to at least "time and a half"—or one and one-half times the customary pay—for those hours worked in excess of the statutory maximum.

Other provisions of the act forbade the use of workers under the age of 16 in most jobs and prohibited the use of workers under the age of 18 in those occupations deemed dangerous. The act was also responsible for the creation of the Wage and Hour Division of the Labor Department.

Over the years, the Fair Labor Standards Act has been subject to amendment but continues to play an integral role in the U.S. workplace.

Cross-references

Employment Law; Labor Department.

References in periodicals archive ?
Some of the most widely known of these include title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Back Pay Act, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
Employers contemplating alternative work arrangements need to look into their liability exposure under a variety of laws, such as the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, workmen's compensation laws, the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OSHA), the National Labor Relations Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, and local zoning ordinances.
Advocating for the 40-hour work week, that party's activism led to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
In a five-page complaint filed March 30, the department also charged the companies, which it claims are a "unified operation," with failing to make and keep adequate and accurate records of its employees' wages and hours, which is another violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938.
2 Rep Miller, George [CA-7] "Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007" To amend the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 to provide for an increase in the Federal minimum wage.
The Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, administered by the Department of Labor gave workers an eight-hour day and abolished child labor.
Louis, charges Allstate with violations of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967 and the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 for instituting a moratorium on hiring back former employee-agents, more than 90% of whom reportedly were over the age of 40.
Answer: Most employers in Oregon have "dual coverage," meaning that they are covered under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, or FLSA, as well as the Oregon wage collection laws in ORS Chapter 652 and the Oregon minimum wage laws in ORS Chapter 653.
Department of Labor (IDOL) issued as final regulations governing federal overtime pay requirements under the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (FLSA).
In fact, a youth minimum wage, authorized by 1996 amendments to the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, allows employers to pay workers who are under age 20 a lower wage for 90 calendar days.