invasion of privacy

(redirected from False light)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

invasion of privacy

n. the intrusion into the personal life of another, without just cause, which can give the person whose privacy has been invaded a right to bring a lawsuit for damages against the person or entity that intruded. However, public personages are not protected in most situations, since they have placed themselves already within the public eye, and their activities (even personal and sometimes intimate) are considered newsworthy, i.e. of legitimate public interest. However, an otherwise non-public individual has a right to privacy from: 1) intrusion on one's solitude or into one's private affairs; 2) public disclosure of embarrassing private information; 3) publicity which puts him/her in a false light to the public; 4) appropriation of one's name or picture for personal or commercial advantage. Lawsuits have arisen from magazine articles on obscure geniuses, use of a wife's name on a hospital insurance form to obtain insurance payment for delivery of a mistress' baby, unauthorized use of a girl's photo to advertise a photographer, and "tabloid" journalism treatment of people as freaks. There are also numerous instances of governmental invasion of privacy such as the Federal Bureau of Investigation compiling files on people considered as political opponents, partially corrected by the passage of the Freedom of Information Act in 1966. The right to privacy originated with an article in the Harvard Law Review in the 1890s written by lawyers "Bull" Warren and future Supreme Court Justice Louis D. Brandeis.

References in periodicals archive ?
De Havilland also sued for false light invasion of privacy and sought to enjoin the distribution and recover damages in the case.
Schwartz, Explaining and Justifying a Limited Tort of False Light Invasion of Privacy, 41 Case W.
Swift may have more success with a false light claim, according to Chew.
Other chapters cover federal preemption of state law, authors' moral rights, unfair competition, the protection of ideas by express or implied contract, defamation, public disclosure of private facts, right of privacy and false light, and right of publicity.
Without Refuge (sequel to The False Light) by Diane Scott Lewis,
Roberts sued McAfee for malicious prosecution, defamation and false light. The district court denied part of McAfee's anti-SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation) motion to dismiss the malicious prosecution claim because of conflicting evidence regarding what information McAfee turned over to the government, but granted its motion to strike Roberts' defamation and false light claims as time-barred.
(23) At the heart of the disagreement over the Stolen Valor Act is a question of framing: Does the First Amendment presumptively protect all speech without regard to truth or falsity, with exceptions for certain types of false speech such as defamation, false light, and fraud?
For McLuhan is in fact setting up a dichotomy between the false light and the true light.
Oh and participants in Real World must also accept that producers may portray them in a "false light".
* False light invasion of privacy involves disclosure of a person's private information to others who have no fight or legitimate information in the content, and which places the individual in a false light before the public.
"Truth" is generally a defense to defamation, but even a technically true statement may give rise to "false light" liability if it is misleading.
Not only did they present life in a "false light," immoral movies seduced the young by inciting lust, providing occasions of sin and destroying the sanctity of marriage, according to the pope.