fantasy

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In fact, Senior's study of the series is one of the few critical works to discuss epic fantasy writing style at length, although Senior does point out a number of problematic elements, such as "difficult vocabulary," "arcane usages," and "contorted, overwrought images" (25), all of which might remind us of how Strunk and White tell us to "avoid fancy words" and use Anglo-Saxon rather than Latin words.
Pask concludes with Lewis and Tolkein's fantasy writing. To do so is, however, to pull up at a fairly safe threshold.
Scholars of English literature explore a variety of interactions between nature and culture in the fantasy writing of J.
From family ties and revelations to the discovery that what she seeks resides in the least likely place of all, Satchel & Sword II: The Caatlach Islands is epic fantasy writing at its best.
This last book is a welcome and beautiful addition to the series, one that children will engage with joy, and one that may inspire carefully crafted fantasy writing of their own.
Scholars in literature, but also a range of other fields extending as far as physics, explore both the theory and the practice of source criticism as applied to the fantasy writing of J.
Each set of eight mint condition stamps comes in a special collector's pack with a fold-out portrait of Merlin and a commentary on British fantasy writing. It's every anorak's delight!
Suvin made a sharp distinction between SF and Fantasy writing, one that although he has modified he has held to, noting that the latter also engages in the process of estrangement but was generally not characterised by any emphasis on cognition.
"This is a patently ridiculous conceit, the kind of fantasy writing that gives fantasy writing a bad name," the author of The Satanic Verses said in the article.
One of the leading new practitioners of fantasy and Gothic elements, China Mieville concludes this sequence of arguments by talking with Gothic Studies about the ways in which cultural materialists still need to conceptualize the cultural labor involved in horror and fantasy writing and the ways in which his own fiction has tried to respond to this gap.
While she is mostly known for her fantasy writing, Linda published in a wide variety of genres and formats, including short stories and picture books.