felony murder doctrine

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felony murder doctrine

n. a rule of criminal statutes that any death which occurs during the commission of a felony is first degree murder, and all participants in that felony or attempted felony can be charged with and found guilty of murder. A typical example is a robbery involving more than one criminal, in which one of them shoots, beats to death or runs over a store clerk, killing the clerk. Even if the death were accidental, all of the participants can be found guilty of felony murder, including those who did no harm, had no gun, and/or did not intend to hurt anyone. In a bizarre situation, if one of the hold-up men or women is killed, his fellow robbers can be charged with murder. (See: murder)

References in periodicals archive ?
The defendant was convicted of first-degree murder under a felony murder theory for the armed robbery and shooting death of the victim, who routinely sold the defendant marijuana.
Part II demonstrates that distributionist sentiments have long existed in American criminal law by analyzing the classically controversial doctrines of felony murder and the attempt-crime divide.
The felony murder charge is provided for in Illinois criminal statutes.
Criminal procedure -- Illegal sentence -- Merger of burglary and felony murder
Taylor and Thomas were charged with multiple offenses, including felony murder. See 18 U.S.C.
(76) Enmund concerned the use of the death penalty for a felony murder conviction where the crime was robbery and another committed the killing.
Christopher Ammons Kemp, originally charged with capital murder for the savage beating of his pregnant ex-girlfriend and the death of her 37-week-old unborn baby, has been convicted of felony murder, a lesser charge, and first-degree domestic violence.
To prove the crime of First Degree Felony Murder, the State must prove the following three elements beyond a reasonable doubt:
State (Becker County)<br />http://mncourts.gov/mncourtsgov/media/Appellate/Supreme%20Court/Standard%20Opinions/OPA170658-061318.pdf<br />Postconviction Relief<br />Knaffla Bar<br />A jury found appellant guilty of first-degree premeditated murder and first-degree felony murder. The District Court sentenced appellant to life imprisonment without the possibility of release on the first-degree premeditated murder conviction.
After a six-day trial and six hours of deliberations, the Dunn County jury on Tuesday night found Osburn guilty of aggravated battery with intent to cause bodily harm, but not guilty of felony murder.