female genital mutilation

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female genital mutilation

infibulation or other mutilation of the whole or any part of a girl's labia majora, labia minora or clitoris. It is a criminal offence and it is an offence for a person in the UK to facilitate the same conduct overseas. It is not a defence to plead that the operation was required as a matter of custom or ritual.
References in periodicals archive ?
Asylum claims involving female genital cutting (53) have been more successful in using female gender as the basis of a particular social group precisely because adjudicators see the practice as culturally pervasive.
Grace Kemunto, a traditional circumciser said, "When you are cut as a woman, you do not become promiscuous and it means you cannot get infected by HIV (Global Challenges: Proponents of Female Genital Cutting in Kenya Promoting It as HIV Prevention Method).
78) The methodology that I use to assess how an individual rights claim pertaining to female genital cutting would be adjudicated under section 27 is largely normative and speculative, given that no such claim has ever been brought.
The exceptions to the rule are the procedure-specific rules mentioned above: female genital cutting and surgical sterilization of a minor.
She is committed to the eradication of female genital cutting.
So Appiah, trying to make his readers understand an African practice they will find abhorrent, rehearses the arguments those who practice female genital cutting will give to counter criticism, but then continues: "I am not endorsing these claims.
where she's currently an advocate for the abolition of female genital cutting.
More than 130 million women worldwide have undergone female genital cutting (FGC), and approximately 228,000 women and girls in this country are either living with the results of or are at risk of undergoing FGC.
The Female Genital Cutting Education and Networking Project.
Female genital cutting, a practice seen in parts of Africa and Asia, is becoming more relevant to health providers here in the United States.
It called on the European Commission to reinforce its funding of education programmes relating to reproductive health, with a focus, amongst others, on the fight against sexual violence and female genital cutting or mutilation.
Lessons learned from interventions and operations research to eradicate female genital cutting (FGC) throughout Africa demonstrate this point.