rent

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rent

1) v. to hire an object or real property for a period of time (or for an open-ended term) for specified payments. 2) n. the amount paid by the renter and received by the owner. Rent may be specified in a written lease, but also may be based on an oral agreement for either a short period or on a month-to-month basis in which the hiring may be terminated on a month's notice. (See: lease)

rent

noun assessment, compensation, cost, fee, income from real estate, land revenue, merces, proceeds, reditus, remuneration, rental, return, revenue
Associated concepts: action for rent, assignment of rent, ejectment, fair rent, fair rental value, holdover, month-tooonth rental, prepayment of rent, reasonable rent, rent strike, rents and proceeds, security, suit for rent, tenancy by will, unaccrued rent

rent

verb allow residency, allow the use of, charter, conducere, contract, demise, enjoy the use of premises, ennage, give occupation, grant a lease, hire out, lease, lend, let, let out, locare, make available, sublease, sublet, take a lease, underlease, underlet, use premises
Associated concepts: option to rent
See also: charge, cost, lease, let, rift, schism, split, sublease, sublet

rent

the sum or amount agreed in the lease or tenancy agreement to be paid by the tenant to the landlord for exclusive possession of the property leased for the period of the lease. The same term maybe used for the charge for use of moveables such as a motor vehicle.

RENT, estates, contracts. A certain profit in money, provisions, chattels, or labor, issuing out of lands and tenements in retribution for the use. 2 Bl. Com. 41; 14 Pet. Rep. 526; Gilb., on Rents, 9; Co. Litt. 142 a; Civ. Code of Lo. art. 2750; Com. on L. & T. 95; 1 Kent, Com. 367; Bradb. on Distr. 24; Bac. Ab. h.t.; Crabb, R. P. SSSS 149-258.
     2. A rent somewhat resembles an annuity, (q.v.) their difference consists in the fact that the former issues out of lands, and the latter is a mere personal charge.
     3. At common law there were three kinds of rents; namely, rent-service, rent-charge, and rent-seek. When the tenant held his land by fealty or other corporeal service, and a certain rent, this was called rent-service; a right of distress was inseparably incident to this rent.
     4. A rent-charge is when the rent is created by deed and the fee granted; and as there is no fealty annexed to such a grant of rent, the right of distress is not in incident; and it requires an express power of distress to be annexed to the grant, which gives it the name of a rent- charge, because the lands are, by the deed, charged with a distress. Co. Litt. 143 b.
     5. Rent-seek, or a dry or barren rent, was rent reserves by deed, without a clause of distress, and in a case in which the owner of the rent had no future interest or reversion in the land, he was driven for a remedy to a writ of annuity or writ of assize.
     6. But the statute of 4 Geo. II. c. 28, abolished all distinction in the several kinds of rent, so far as to give the remedy by distress in cases of rents-seek, rents of assize, and chief rents, as in the case of rents reserved upon a lease. In Pennsylvania, a distress is inseparably incident to every species of rent that may be reduced to a certainty. 2 Rawle's Rep. 13. In New York, it seems the remedy by distress exists for all kinds of rent. 3 Kent Com. 368. Vide Distress; 18 Viner's Abr. 472; Woodf, L. & T. 184 Gilb. on Rents Com. Dig. h.t.. Dane's Ab. Index, h.t.
     7. As to the time when the rent becomes due, it is proper to observe, that there is a distinction to be made. It becomes due for the purpose of making a demand to take advantage of a condition of reentry, or to tender it to save a forfeiture, at sunset of the day on which it is due: but it is not actually due till midnight, for any other purpose. An action could not be supported which had been commenced on the day it became due, although commenced after sunset; and if the owner of the fee died between sunset and midnight of that day, the heir and not the executor would be entitled to the rent. 1 Saund. 287; 10 Co. 127 b; 2 Madd. Ch. R. 268; 1 P. Wms. 177; S. C. 1 Salk, 578. See generally, Bac. Ab. h.t.; Bouv. Inst. Index h.t.; and Distress; Reentry.

References in periodicals archive ?
Nonetheless, in contemporaneously conducted trials, we found that unconditional fixed payments led to significantly higher response rates than actuarially equivalent lotteries, whereas conditional fixed payments led to similar response rates as actuarially equivalent lotteries.
Thus, it seems that investigators wishing to augment response to web-based clinician surveys will either have to develop novel and secure methods for administering unconditional fixed payments to potential respondents, or utilize other nonfinancial measures to encourage response.
Our study has several limitations: first, as noted, we did not directly compare unconditional and conditional fixed payments.
Because the most readily apparent alternative for web-based surveys--promising fixed payments conditional on response--may also lack efficacy, future research is needed to determine whether or how financial incentives can be used to induce response to web-based clinician surveys.
5 bill in the initial outgoing envelope as an unconditional (up-front) fixed payment.
WMB currently has long-term tolling agreements for approximately 7,700 megawatts of generating capacity, under which it is obligated to make fixed payments averaging $400 million over the next several years, with a total remaining net present value of about $2.
The interim shift from per unit to fixed payments is not expected to have a material impact on Rambus's 2004 revenues.
This release contains forward-looking statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, such as the statement related to the possible effect that the shift from per unit royalty payments to fixed payments could have on Rambus's 2004 revenues and as to the beneficial nature of the extended agreement.
WMB currently has long-term tolling agreements for approximately 7,500 megawatts of generating capacity under which it is obligated to make fixed payments averaging $400 million over the next several years with total gross payments of $6.
in exchange for certain fixed payments during approximately the next two years and for royalties from future sales of this product line and any future products based on the Bioccelerator intellectual property.
Although WMB has been successful in winding down speculative trading positions and reducing ongoing operating expenses at EM&T, the company remains obligated to make fixed payments obligations under long-term tolling and other capacity arrangements in excess of $400 million annually of which 70% are contractually hedged with various offtake agreements through 2008.