foreign corporation

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foreign corporation

n. a corporation which is incorporated under the laws of a different state or nation. A "foreign" corporation must file a notice of doing business in any state in which it does substantial regular business. It must name an "agent for acceptance of service" in that state, or the Secretary of State in some jurisdictions will automatically be that agent so people doing business with a foreign corporation will be able bring legal actions locally if necessary. Example: the Whoopee Widget Corporation is incorporated in Delaware. It has a sales office in Arizona, which does not make a guaranteed refund to Jack Jones of Arizona. Jones can sue Whoopee in Arizona and serve the Arizona Secretary of State or Whoopee's designated agent.

References in periodicals archive ?
14, 1990, stated that "the purpose of the rule requiring foreign corporations to secure a license to do business in the Philippines is to enable us to exercise jurisdiction over them for the regulation of their activities in this country.
3) The upper-tier foreign corporations will each likewise exercise the election but to be treated as disregarded entities and with the election exercised such that their deemed liquidation is treated as occurring subsequent to the date of the grantor's demise.
persons who are officers, directors, or shareholders in certain foreign corporations.
881(b)(2)], and foreign corporations are defined as those organized under the laws of a foreign country or U.S.
For Tax Year 2004, foreign corporations controlled by U.S.
Enacted in 1986, (11) the purpose of the branch profits tax is to bring about more similar tax treatment of foreign corporations operating in the United States through U.S.
In the 1960s Congress decided to tax some of this income when it was earned (rather than when it was brought back into the United States), by taxing certain controlled foreign corporations (CFCs).
tax on income earned indirectly by Americans through foreign corporations. Generally, U.S.
Many foreign corporations which had never been subject to U.S.
This item discusses how foreign corporations that generate income from intangible assets are affected by the economic nexus rules as well as the water's-edge rules.

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