care

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Care

Watchful attention; custody; diligence; concern; caution; as opposed to Negligence or carelessness.

In the law of negligence, the standard of reasonable conduct determines the amount of care to be exercised in a situation. The care taken must be proportional to the apparent risk. As danger increases, commensurate caution must be observed.

Slight care is the care persons of ordinary prudence generally exercise in regard to their personal affairs of minimal importance.

Reasonable care, also known as ordinary care, is the degree of care, diligence, or precaution that may fairly, ordinarily, and properly be expected or required in consideration of the nature of the action, the subject matter, and the surrounding circumstances.

Great care is the degree of care that persons of ordinary prudence usually exercise with respect to their personal affairs of great importance.

Another type of care is that which a fiduciary—a person having a duty, created by his or her undertaking, to act primarily for another's benefit—exercises in regard to valuable possessions entrusted to him or her by another.

care

n. in law, to be attentive, prudent and vigilant. Essentially, care (and careful) means that a person does everything he/she is supposed to do (to prevent an accident). It is the opposite of negligence (and negligent), which makes the responsible person liable for damages to persons injured. If a person "exercises care," a court cannot find him/her responsible for damages from an accident in which he/she is involved. (See: careless)

care

(Be cautious), verb be cautious, be concerned, bear in mind, beware, consider, curare, give heed to, guard, have regard, heed, look out for, mind, pay attention to, protect, take precautions, watch out for, watch over
Associated concepts: care and caution, care and skill, careful, careless, degree of care, due care, extraordinary care, great care, lack of care, ordinary care, slight care, want of care

care

(Regard), verb administer to, attend, attend to, be concerned, be concerned for, become involved, bother, foster, mind, minister to, nurture, pay attention to, serve, supervise, support, sustain, tend, watch over
Associated concepts: care and custody, care and mainteeance, custody or control
See also: administration, agency, aid, alimony, apprehension, assistance, auspices, burden, caution, charge, concern, consideration, constraint, control, custody, direction, discretion, fear, generalship, guidance, heed, help, imprisonment, interest, maintenance, management, notice, particularity, patronage, precaution, preservation, problem, protection, prudence, regard, relief, rigor, safekeeping, shelter, supervision, support, surveillance, trust, upkeep, ward, weight
References in periodicals archive ?
25] state that moral distress is caused by providing poor-quality or futile care, unsuccessful advocacy and unrealistic hope.
Demands for futile care could be considered poor parental decision making, and consequently abusive.
Then, is the use of futile care truly protective of the professional ethic?
With continuous-flow pumps, patients with heart failure likely will face futile care issues not related to cardiac conditions, such as renal failure, dementia, or infection (Brush et al.
Their inner convictions, however, told them that this patient could have been better served by discontinuing the futile care attempts and delivering symptom-relieving comfort care.
Since dividing by zero defines infinity (1) and the benefits of futile care are zero, a costs/benefits ratio analysis of futile clinical care reveals its costs are infinite.
These research findings should therefore do much to dispel a common myth of extensive and expensive, but largely futile care in hospital for terminally ill and dying Canadians.
Many patients simply do not want or need much of the high-tech and futile care that create these final-day costs.
Expansive sex education for students, mandatory Texas Futile Care Law education for the elderly, and bipolar screening for high school students are just a few of the initiatives Aguado seeks to implement.
Despite this contentiousness, I believe that futile care is at this point considered "justifiable.
Many health care workers have emphatically discussed with family and patients what their wishes are in situations of hopeless, futile care.
Resource Consumption and the Extent of Futile Care among Patients in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Setting," Pediatrics 128 (1996): 742-7.