practitioner

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practitioner

noun artificer, artisan, artist, attorney, counselor, craftsman, creative worker, journeyman, lawyer, master worker, professional, solicitor, specialist, trained person
Associated concepts: legal practitioner, single practitioner, sole practitioner
See also: addict, attorney, esquire, expert, professional, specialist
References in periodicals archive ?
The GNP concept has remained so popular for so long because of five reasons.
It is likely that richer countries would have more complete reporting than poorer ones, which would lead to the opposite association between diarrhea and GNP to that reported.
Logically, if an increase in real GNP implies an increase in physical volume, no increase in physical volume implies no increase in real GNP, which was the point of Assertion 3.
The UC model used below to estimate permanent and transitory components of GNP was selected using the Bayesian Information Criterion (BIC) from a large set of competing models representing the GNP/consumption system.
Besides, since weighted foreign resources are considered an invariant measure of wealth of an economy, weights depend upon export earnings and GNP.
economy, is the suggestion that GNP can become stalled at low levels even when there is nothing wrong with the fundamentals of the economy.
Only in 1980 do the 1987 base-year data show a larger decline in GNP than do the figures based on prices and weights of earlier years.
Total government spending (including expenditures by states and localities) was less than 8 per cent of the GNP in 1900.
As for the large number of companies that are not overleveraged, they will still have to confront the likelihood that domestic consumption and GNP growth could be curtailed for a considerably longer period than the typical, post-war downturn while several forces play themselves out: the bloated domestic-services sector downsizes, taxes rise to meet deficits and otherwise unsustainable borrowing demands, household savings rebound and families rebuild their balance sheets the old-fashioned way (i.
This is the result of a vicious cycle: The slow expansion of real GNP reflects sluggish growth of consumer spending (which is roughly 66% of GNP).
Canada, after enduring the longest and deepest recession of the G7 (Group of seven) countries, posted strong positive GNP growth in the second quarter of 1991.
Most forecast that real GNP will grow A to 1 percent over the four quarters of 1991; given the decline during the first quarter, this central tendency range for 1991 as a whole implies an aPPreciable pickup in activity over the remainder of the year.