gang

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SEATTLE, July 15 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- In a matter of days, about 130 youth from across the country will converge at the nation's capital to push for an end to gang violence.
adults believe "lack of adult supervision" is the main cause of gang violence among youth.
She made the trip as part of Sport Relief to highlight the steps local people had made to try to end gang violence that had marred the scheme for decades.
My heart is broken because this gang violence must stop," Ismail said through tears.
Network cities, which include Fresno, Los Angeles, Oakland, Oxnard, Richmond, Sacramento, Salinas, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Rosa and Stockton, have engaged local clergy and faith communities in the development of comprehensive action plans to reduce gang violence.
Fears that seven years of progress towards removing gun and gang violence, from Handsworth, Lozells and Aston, could be undone have been raised in a bleak report to city councillors.
Gang violence has dropped dramatically over the past two years with strong suppression efforts by the LAPD.
The orders will allow yobs to be barred from using the internet to plan gang violence and force them to join mediation sessions or community programmes as an alternative to gang violence.
As for our politicians, they all have plenty to say but do very little to stop the gang violence on our streets.
Additionally, attention to minor infractions that erode well-kept, safe environments, such as loud music, abandoned cars, and graffiti, can prevent the spread of gang violence, drug abuse, and other criminal conduct.
According to the court, riding motorcycles, going to parties and bonding with friends did not involve matters of public concern, where the purpose of the officers' association with the gang was entirely social in nature, the gang had a national reputation for violence and crime, and the state had serious problems with gang violence in prisons.
The book is at its best in those essays that push the conceptual or topical boundaries of violence history, such as Davies's exploration of women's active participation in gang violence, Arnot's psychological analysis of child murderers and Jackson's examination of women professionals' participation in the regulation of violence.