Geneva Convention


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Geneva Convention

an international convention adopted in Geneva. There have been a number of these. The one most likely to be encountered by the general public is that on treatment of prisoners of war. As a convention it is part of international law. Other notable conventions carrying the Geneva name are those on Law of the Sea 1958 and the 1951 Law Relating to the Status of Refugees.
References in periodicals archive ?
August 13, 2019, marks the 70th Anniversary of the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 (GC70).
Support for the Geneva Conventions is vital not only to how wars are fought, but also to how they end.
Article 13 of the third Geneva convention states that PoWs must be humanely treated and "protected, particularly against acts of violence or intimidation and against insults and public curiosity".
The US is supporting the Saudis to commit these grave breaches of the 1949 Geneva Conventions in the knowledge that such attacks will cause incidental loss of life or injury to civilians or damage to civilian objects or widespread, long-term and severe damage to the natural environment which are clearly excessive in relation to the concrete and direct overall military advantage anticipated.
It is enshrined in documents ranging from the Lieber Code of 1863 to the four Geneva Conventions of 1949 and the Additional Protocols of 1977.
The 1949 Geneva Convention provides for the protection of fundamental human rights in the event of war, including the care of wounded, sick and prisoners of war, and the protection of civilians on the battlefield or in the occupied territories.
Relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War (Third Geneva Convention),
"Just as the Fourth Geneva Convention has long protected civilians in times of war, we now need a Digital Geneva Convention that will commit governments to protecting civilians from nation-state attacks in times of peace," Smith (https://blogs.microsoft.com/on-the-issues/2017/02/14/need-digital-geneva-convention/#sm.00017ufdx1173lfhivfven3q9mbh5) wrote.
25, 2006), archived at http://perma.cc/52LH-56JZ (suggesting that prior legislation could help Congress interpret certain parts of the Geneva Convention that was considered too vague).
national, whether military or civilian, to violate the Geneva Convention by engaging in murder, torture, or inhuman treatment.
This is most prominently featured in the Geneva Convention, along with its additional protocols.
(9) The first Geneva Convention, (10) adopted in 1864,

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