Gentleman


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GENTLEMAN. In the English law, according to Sir Edward Coke, is one who bears a coat of armor. 2 Inst. 667. In the United States, this word is unknown to the law, but in many places it is applied, by courtesy, to all men. See Poth. Proc. Crim. sect. 1, App. Sec. 3.

References in classic literature ?
'Ay, my man,' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat, with a condescending smile.
'Walk in,' said the gentleman in the white waistcoat.
Barnaby and his mother walked on, on either side of the gentleman on horseback, who surveyed each of them from time to time in a proud and coarse manner, and occasionally thundered out some question, the tone of which alarmed Barnaby so much that he could find no answer, and, as a matter of course, could make him no reply.
'An idiot, eh?' said the gentleman, looking at Barnaby as he spoke.
Liked to put in his days pottering about the little garden he'd made for himself, looking after his flowers and his fowls, and sit of an evening listening to Gentleman
And he got a habit of switching Gentleman off from his theories on Life in general to Woman in particular.
'I'm going to get down in the next street,' returned the old gentleman. 'If you like to come on after us, you may have the job.'
'Will you go on, sir,' said the old gentleman, gravely, 'or are we to wait here for you till it's too late for our appointment?'
On accosting the landlord, the fair gentleman volunteered the following statement:
He had hardly uttered the word, when the whole half-dozen regiments levelled their muskets as if they had but one common object, and that object the Pickwickians, and burst forth with the most awful and tremendous discharge that ever shook the earth to its centres, or an elderly gentleman off his.
Monk's lieutenant asked, at the appearance of Athos, if that were the same gentleman with whom the General had left the tent.
But as our gentle reader may possibly have a better opinion of the young gentleman than her ladyship, and may even have some concern, should it be apprehended that, during this unhappy separation from Sophia, he took up his residence either at an inn, or in the street; we shall now give an account of his lodging, which was indeed in a very reputable house, and in a very good part of the town.