Good Friday Agreement


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Good Friday Agreement

the agreement between the British and Irish governments and the political parties in Northern Ireland reached on 10 April 1998 in Belfast following lengthy talks. The purpose of the agreement is to deal with relations between the two communities in Northern Ireland; relations between the two parts of Ireland; and between Ireland north and south and the other parts of the British Isles. All parties undertook to renounce violence and to use their influence to ensure that weapons were decommissioned. A 108-member Northern Ireland Assembly was to be created, as well as a North-South Council to discuss matters of mutual interest to Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic and a British-Irish Council that would be a forum for all the jurisdictions in the British Isles. The Irish government undertook to remove the clauses in its Constitution that claimed jurisdiction over Northern Ireland, and all parties agreed that the constitutional status of Northern Ireland could be changed only by the consent of a majority of the people of Northern Ireland. It replaced the 1985 ANGLO-IRISH AGREEMENT.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Congressional Friends of Ireland, a group in the US Congress which supports and promotes peace and reconciliation in Northern Ireland, has written to Boris Johnson warning that it will oppose any US-UK trade deal if it risks undermining the Good Friday Agreement.
The Good Friday Agreement serves as the bedrock of peace in Northern Ireland and as a beacon of hope for the entire world.
The 1998 Good Friday Agreement ended the Northern Ireland conflict, which broke out in the 1960s.
THERE is "no chance" of a US-UK trade deal succeeding if Brexit jeopardises the Good Friday Agreement, the speaker of the US House of Representatives has warned.
diplomats worry that Johnson's Brexit plans could disrupt the 1998 Good Friday Agreement, which established Northern Ireland as a part of the United Kingdom. 
She added: "If the British Government have factored into their calculations a hard border, then they must factor in a unity referendum as laid out in the Good Friday Agreement.
A KEY architect of the Good Friday Agreement has warned that the peace treaty will be destroyed by the Northern Ireland backstop still being pushed by the EU.
Conservative MP Sir Graham Brady The Government was "too pliant" in accepting the EU's argument that the Irish backstop was the only way to protect the Good Friday Agreement, Sir Graham Brady has said.
Most of us in the rest of the UK too often take Northern Ireland's peace for granted and rarely think much about the anniversary of the Good Friday Agreement each year.
THE Good Friday Agreement was hard won after 30 years of conflict.
The chairman of the Good Friday Agreement negotiations had required a commitment to non-violence and democracy from all the parties before entering dialogue, one which endures today.