Good Samaritan rule

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Good Samaritan rule

n. from a Biblical story, if a volunteer comes to the aid of an injured or ill person who is a stranger, the person giving the aid owes the stranger a duty of being reasonably careful. In some circumstances negligence could result in a claim of negligent care if the injuries or illness were made worse by the volunteer's negligence. Thus, if Jack Goodguy sees a man lying by the road, a victim of a hit and run accident, and moves the injured man, resulting in a worsening of the injury or a new injury, instead of calling for an ambulance, Goodguy may find himself on the wrong end of a lawsuit for millions of dollars.

Copyright © 1981-2005 by Gerald N. Hill and Kathleen T. Hill. All Right reserved.
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ISSUE: Good Samaritan Laws protecting physicians, nurses, and other healthcare providers exist in virtually all of the United States.
"The good Samaritan law is something people don't understand enough," according to Michelle Hines.
"The proposed Good Samaritan law will give companies the confidence they need to ensure that they keep their customers informed.
the Good Samaritan law aims to protect bystanders if they assist, with good intentions, someone who is in danger until emergency medical services arrive.
Ignorance will not be a defense since the good Samaritan law, called the "Year 2000 Information and Readiness Disclosure Act" (Public Law 105-271), protects office building owners' good-faith disclosure of Y2K plans and activities to tenant.
We have defibrillators in states that don't have the Good Samaritan law, and we cover those properties with the PLI."
Although their Good Samaritan Law is aimed at people with professional ability or the duty to help, it can be widened to apply to members of the public.
Donors are held harmless by the federal Good Samaritan Law. Plus, you get a tax write-off.
MedChi plans to pursue limits on lawyers' fees, structured settlements that can be paid over time, reforming the calculation of economic damage payments, and enactment of a Good Samaritan law.
A woman accused of turning her friend into a paraplegic by pulling her out of a wrecked car "like a rag doll" may not be protected by California's Good Samaritan law, a court has ruled.
An unreported case earlier this year from Wisconsin illustrates how a good Samaritan law can be applied in a negligence case.