Progressive Tax

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Progressive Tax

A type of graduated tax that applies higher tax rates as the income of the taxpayer increases.

References in periodicals archive ?
income tax with no deductions, or the current graduated income tax with
A good start would be to reinstitute an honest system of graduated income tax.
In Arizona, exit polls showed a 2-to-1 margin for a flat tax, but in North Dakota the GOP voters favored the existing graduated income tax by 2-to-1.
This ethos leads to Kuenne's proposed Bill of Rights, which has provisions meant to assure that people have a right to whatever they have justly acquired (an idea borrowed from Nozick); that the economy is based on the institution of free markets; that everyone is entitled to some reasonable standard of living; that income transfers should be in cash, not in kind nor in protection from competition; and that the government is to be financed by a graduated income tax.
The first graduated income tax law was passed by a predominantly Democratic Congress after acrimonious debate.
There was virtually no regulation of the economy, although the Grangers and Populist William Jennings Bryan were arguing for a graduated income tax, labor laws, sound money, control of railroads and communications, and popular election of the Senate.
The Founding Fathers created the clause to ensure no special favor or privilege extended to anyone at the expense of another, but the current cornerstone of our tax system is the graduated income tax rate, which taxes some citizens at a higher rate than others.
He favors a policy agenda that Illinois Democrats have touted but haven't advanced when they could have: a graduated income tax, an elected school board in Chicago, an increase in the minimum wage.
After raising the possibility of creating a graduated income tax in Massachusetts -- under which wealthier residents would pay a higher percentage of taxes -- Coakley said she had no immediate plans to pursue the change.
The graduated income tax is, in fact, an artifact of Wilson an Marxism, adopted from Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto by President Woodrow Wilson and his allies in Congress in 1913.
It is not that hard to imagine the measure being a modest graduated income tax, excluding households with the lowest incomes, with a three- or four-year sunset clause.
Rumored items to help pay for a cut in the MBT have included the introduction of a graduated income tax (which would require a constitutional amendment) and reintroduction of a plan to extend the sales tax to services.

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