Gradus

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GRADUS. This is a Latin word, literally signifying a step; figuratively it is used to designate a person in the ascending or descending line, in genealogy; a degree.

A Law Dictionary, Adapted to the Constitution and Laws of the United States. By John Bouvier. Published 1856.
References in periodicals archive ?
The School for Velocity, for instance, is the title of a famous, much-dreaded work of piano pedagogy by Carl Czerny, and one of the two novellas it comprises, gradus ad parnassum, is the title of another such work by Muzio Clementi.
In the second category are gradus ad parnassum, the other novella in The School for Velocity, which opens with a governing metaphor before the onset of the story line, and the lyrical, incantatory openings, purposely disorienting through their lack of relation to specific time or place over several pages, of The Distant Sound and Awakening to the Great Sleep War.
Lux calls the second piece, gradus ad parnassum, a "satyr play" (55), a bizarre or grotesque variant of the first, to which we should add that gradus ad parnassum takes the implications of Mahler's words in the opposite direction, with characters yielding to passivity as everything falls to pieces around them.
The list of variant readings, editorial emendations, and remarks exhaustively documents the variants between the consulted sources, while the appendix transcribes passages from "Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum," "Jumbo's Lullaby," and "Serenade of the Doll" as heard on the Welte rolls, with the qualifier: "These may include slips or mechanical inaccuracies, and should be regarded with caution" (p.
In the case of "Doctor Gradus ad Parnassum" and "The Snow Is Dancing," there are only four grand-staff systems on each page (instead of the usual five elsewhere), yielding a striking blank space of one and a half inches between each system, a highly unusual and pleasing layout that allows plenty of room for the occasional indications of variants in tiny notes over the staff.
There are three exercises in fourth species counterpoint a tre, each constructed upon the famous Dorian cantus firmus encountered throughout Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum (Vienna: Gehlen, 1725), the other voices approaching the three complete specimens found in the section "De ligatura" of the Gradus (pp.
His book The Study of Fugue (New Brunswick, N.J.: Rutgers University Press, 1958) has achieved the status of a classic, and he has provided us with a translation of the parts of Johann Joseph Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum that deal with simple counterpoint.
26-27) up (with different meaning) in Lorenz Christoph Mizler's 1742 German translation of Johann Joseph Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum. But here as elsewhere Deppert seems to assume that the words in their modern usage present no problems and that his analyses raise no theoretical issues for the modern reader.
198) with the first use of the word Tonart ("tonality"), in his Gross-Generalbass-Schule of 1731; the term was subsequently taken up (with different meaning) in Lorenz Christoph Mizler's 1742 German translation of Johann Joseph Fux's Gradus ad Parnassum. But here as elsewhere Deppert seems to assume that the words in their modern usage present no problems and that his analyses raise no theoretical issues for the modern reader.